A Travellerspoint blog

On the Gin Drinkers' Line.

The Maclehose Trail Stage Six.

sunny

When I started doing this blog, my idea was to redo about ten to fifteen places in Hong Kong l had done years ago. Now due to the Internet and Google I have done about twenty places and have about a hundred left to do!!!! How has this happened? At this rate, I may need another twenty years here to finish everything.

Yesterday I set out to complete Stage Six of the Maclehose Trail, specifically because I really wanted to visit the Gin Drinkers' Line, which I first read about just a few days ago while researching the war stoves on Quarry Bay Tree Walk.

The idea for the Gin Drinkers’ Line came from the Maginot Line in France and it was even sometimes referred to as the Oriental Maginot Line. The line stretched for eighteen kilometres across the New Territories and consisted of gun batteries, block houses, pillboxes, firing trenches, redoubts and tunnels. It was built by the British after the Japanese invaded Guangdong in December 1938. It was called the Gin Drinkers’ Line because it began at Gin Drinkers’ Bay, which due to land reclamation, is now the Kwai Chung/Kwai Fong area. This area was originally known as Gin Drinkers' Bay because of rowdy, drunken celebrations which took place whenever boats were launched here.

The British built the Gin Drinkers' Line as a defensive structure that was supposed to hold off any attempted Japanese invasion of Hong Kong for a few weeks, however, when the Japanese finally attacked the line on December 8th, 1941, it was woefully undermanned. There were only three British Army battalions manning the whole of the line. These were the 2nd Battalion, Royal Scots in the west, the 2/14th Battalion, Punjab Regiment in the centre and the 5/7th Battalion, Rajput Regiment in the east. The whole line fell within just two days forcing the British to retreat first to the Devil's Peak in Lei Yue Mun and then later to Hong Kong Island. The whole of Hong Kong surrendered to the Japanese on Christmas day 1941.

Much of the Gin Drinkers’ Line has now crumbled or become overgrown, but the area near the Shing Mun Reservoir and around Smugglers' Ridge is one of the areas which has survived. Here you can still see a series of military tunnels with names like: Regent Street, Charing Cross, Piccadilly, Oxford Street, Shaftesbury Avenue and Haymarket. I thought this was just an example of British sense of humour, but I read one account that suggests the names were actually to help the British soldiers navigate the tunnels.

To get to Stage Six of the Maclehose Trail I took the MTR to Tsuen Wan, exited through exit B onto a walkway, crossed Castle Peak Road, walked down Chung On Road and turned right onto Shui Wo Street. Unfortunately, I was then greeted by an enormous queue for the number 82 minibus to the Shing Mun Reservoir. I ended up standing in line for about thirty minutes. I really, really wanted to see the Gin Drinkers' Line or I would not have waited. I exited from the minibus at the last stop and, being me, initially set off in the total wrong direction. Before I set off, I noticed a lovely little sign for the Shing Mun Country Park, designed to look like a fairy door. I then headed up the stairs to the Shing Mun Visitor Centre and merrily set off along the edge of the Shing Mun Reservoir. Within about twenty minutes, I knew I was going the wrong way, so I took some photos of the reservoir and the wild monkeys wandering around it and headed back the way I had come. My husband has always been the one with the sense of direction and, although I am getting better, I frequently go wrong before I get it right.

Fairy Door.

Fairy Door.

Shing Mun Reservoir.

Shing Mun Reservoir.

Shing Mun Reservoir.

Shing Mun Reservoir.

Shing Mun Reservoir.

Shing Mun Reservoir.

Shing Mun Reservoir.

Shing Mun Reservoir.

Shing Mun Reservoir.

Shing Mun Reservoir.

Monkeys.

Monkeys.

Monkeys.

Monkeys.

Monkeys.

Monkeys.

Monkeys.

Monkeys.

I wasn't upset about going the wrong way, as the views of the reservoir from this area proved to be prettier than the ones on the correct walk. To get on the correct walk I headed back to that fairy door. If I was standing facing that door, I then needed to go to the right along the road to reach the Maclehose Trail. The walk along the road was not overly exciting, but I did pass some pretty flowering trees, then I reached another part of the Shing Mun Reservoir, took some photos and was delighted to see a sign pointing towards a war relics trail, which led me to a sign pointing to the Maclehose Trail Section Six. Finally, l had found it! When the Japanese gained control of the Gin Drinkers' Line they also gained control of several reservoirs, affecting the water supply of the people of Hong Kong.

Beautiful Trees.

Beautiful Trees.

Flowering Trees.

Flowering Trees.

Flowering Trees.

Flowering Trees.

Sign to the War Relics.

Sign to the War Relics.

Shing Mun Reservoir.

Shing Mun Reservoir.

Shing Mun Reservoir.

Shing Mun Reservoir.

Sign for the Maclehose Trail.

Sign for the Maclehose Trail.

The start of the trail involved climbing lots of steps and it wasn't long before I was getting out of breath. When I finally reached the top, the first marked relic I saw was an air vent above one of the tunnels. This was followed by a sign saying 'desolate tunnel, do not enter'. I foolishly did not look for this tunnel, but when I saw a similar sign a bit further on, I left the path and went to see the tunnel. I'm not absolutely sure which tunnel this was, but I think it might have been Piccadilly. It appeared to have suffered shell damage.

Air Vent.

Air Vent.

Danger Desolate Tunnel Sign.

Danger Desolate Tunnel Sign.

Shelled Tunnel.

Shelled Tunnel.

Shelled Tunnel.

Shelled Tunnel.

Shelled Tunnel.

Shelled Tunnel.

I walked on a bit further and found three tunnels. Two of them were Regent Street and Shaftesbury Avenue, the other was unnamed, but was possibly an exit from Piccadilly. I went half way along the unnamed one until it was too dark to see, then came out and went all the way along Shaftesbury Avenue. There was a sign here to the Strand Palace Hotel. The Strand Palace Hotel was the Operational Headquarters of the Gin Drinkers' Line. It was located in the Shing Mun Redoubt. When I emerged from the Shaftesbury Avenue Tunnel, I noticed beautiful views over Kowloon. Venturing further along I found Charing Cross which appeared dry, but which I've read is often flooded and filled with stagnant water and mud. I've seen other people's blogs about exploring the tunnels and they have encountered bats, lizards, giant centipedes etc. To be honest you need a torch to do the tunnels justice. I didn't have one and only did the tunnels with some light and where I could stand up. I'm also a bit claustrophobic so there was no way I was crawling through any narrow or blocked tunnels, no matter how fascinating they were.

Regent Street and Shaftesbury Avenue.

Regent Street and Shaftesbury Avenue.

To Strand Palace Hotel.

To Strand Palace Hotel.

Inside Shaftesbury Avenue.

Inside Shaftesbury Avenue.

The Other End of Shaftesbury Avenue.

The Other End of Shaftesbury Avenue.

Inside a Tunnel.

Inside a Tunnel.

Inside a Tunnel.

Inside a Tunnel.

Inside a Tunnel. Apparently the writing is the name of the Japanese commander who gained control of the Gin Drinkers' Line. He attacked before he was ordered to and was almost court-martialed for doing so.

Inside a Tunnel. Apparently the writing is the name of the Japanese commander who gained control of the Gin Drinkers' Line. He attacked before he was ordered to and was almost court-martialed for doing so.

Inside a Tunnel.

Inside a Tunnel.

Mud  Choked Tunnel.

Mud Choked Tunnel.

Military Marker indicating Golden Hill.

Military Marker indicating Golden Hill.

Tunnel Entrance.

Tunnel Entrance.

Tunnel.

Tunnel.

Tunnel Entrance.

Tunnel Entrance.

Charing Cross

Charing Cross

Charing Cross

Charing Cross

When I finished looking at the tunnels, I went further up the hill and ended up at the Shing Mun Redoubt which was nicknamed the Strand Palace Hotel. There was a walking tour going on and the participants were all sitting on the roof of the redoubt. I went inside alone. Inside you can still see the bullet holes and shrapnel damage on the walls and roof. The rooms are marked as kitchen, sleeping quarters, toilet with a hasty note saying please don't use it as this now. There's also a tunnel leading down to Charing Cross. I only did a short stretch of it till it got too dark. There are sudden irregular steps and other things to trip you up. It is easy to have an accident if you can't see. Suddenly I heard a noise behind me and realised the whole walking tour group had come inside the redoubt. The crowds caused me to beat a hasty retreat. Confined spaces with lots of people are really not for me.

In the Redoubt.

In the Redoubt.

In the Redoubt.

In the Redoubt.

In the Redoubt.

In the Redoubt.

In the Redoubt.

In the Redoubt.

And then the hoards descended.

And then the hoards descended.

Signs in the Redoubt.

Signs in the Redoubt.

Signs in the Redoubt.

Signs in the Redoubt.

Signs in the Redoubt.

Signs in the Redoubt.

In the Redoubt.

In the Redoubt.

Air Vent.

Air Vent.

Going down into a tunnel.

Going down into a tunnel.

Going down into a tunnel.

Going down into a tunnel.

Going down into a tunnel.

Going down into a tunnel.

On the Roof of the Redoubt.

On the Roof of the Redoubt.

According to things I have read there are more war remains hidden around in the bushes and I am sure they would be fascinating to see, but I was satisfied that I had seen enough for one day, so I continued my walk which climbed further up Smugglers Ridge where there were beautiful views over Kowloon and lots of flowering trees and bushes.

View of the Shing Mun Reservoir from Smuggler's Ridge.

View of the Shing Mun Reservoir from Smuggler's Ridge.

View of the Shing Mun Reservoir from Smuggler's Ridge.

View of the Shing Mun Reservoir from Smuggler's Ridge.

The Trail up the Ridge.

The Trail up the Ridge.

View over Kwai Cheung, Kowloon.

View over Kwai Cheung, Kowloon.

View Over Kowloon.

View Over Kowloon.

Chinese New Year Flowers.

Chinese New Year Flowers.

Chinese New Year Flowers.

Chinese New Year Flowers.

Along the Trail.

Along the Trail.

Along the Trail.

Along the Trail.

Path over Smugglers' Ridge.

Path over Smugglers' Ridge.

Path over Smugglers' Ridge.

Path over Smugglers' Ridge.

Beautiful Flowers.

Beautiful Flowers.

Beautiful Flowers.

Beautiful Flowers.

Colourful Ferns.

Colourful Ferns.

Mountain Scenery.

Mountain Scenery.

Woods on Smugglers' Ridge.

Woods on Smugglers' Ridge.

Woods on Smugglers' Ridge.

Woods on Smugglers' Ridge.

When I descended from Smugglers Ridge, I arrived on a paved road. This area is called Golden Hill, or in Chinese - Kam Shan. It is part of the Kam Shan Country Park and the road leads to Kowloon Reservoir. All around this area was filled with macaques. Apparently there are around 1,800 wild monkeys in Hong Kong. They are all Rhesus Macaques or Long-tailed Macaques and are found only in and around Kam Shan, Lion Rock and Shing Mun Country Parks. I had no food with me, only water, so they had no interest in me, but I saw one leap onto a man's rucksack which he was carrying on his back and he had to shake it off. I would have screamed the place down if it had been me. Before getting to the reservoir, I passed a little stream and a waterfall.

Don't feed those damned monkeys sign.

Don't feed those damned monkeys sign.

Monkey.

Monkey.

Monkey.

Monkey.

Monkey.

Monkey.

Monkey.

Monkey.

Monkey.

Monkey.

Monkey and Pavillion.

Monkey and Pavillion.

Monkey.

Monkey.

Monkey.

Monkey.

Monkey.

Monkey.

Stream.

Stream.

Stream.

Stream.

Golden Hill Road Sign.

Golden Hill Road Sign.

Golden Hill Road.

Golden Hill Road.

Waterfall.

Waterfall.

Colourful Vegetation.

Colourful Vegetation.

Flowers.

Flowers.

Having survived the monkeys, I headed towards Kowloon Reservoir which is very close to Tai Po Road where I would finish my hike and catch a bus back to the MTR.

Kowloon Reservoir.

Kowloon Reservoir.

Kowloon Reservoir.

Kowloon Reservoir.

Kowloon Reservoir.

Kowloon Reservoir.

Kowloon Reservoir.

Kowloon Reservoir.

At the Reservoir.

At the Reservoir.

At the Reservoir.

At the Reservoir.

At the Reservoir.

At the Reservoir.

Kowloon Reservoir Dam Wall.

Kowloon Reservoir Dam Wall.

At the Reservoir.

At the Reservoir.

At the end of the reservoir there were several beautiful flame trees and when I crossed the road and went to the bus stop there was another sign up saying 'Don't Feed the Monkeys'. The sign was right next to a bin that a group of monkeys were surrounding and they were busily pulling all the discarded food stuff out of. Only two buses stop at this bus-stop, so I was just thinking there will be a long wait and I'll have to stand when a red minibus suddenly appeared. You must pay on a red minibus, they don't accept octopus cards. The driver was taking people to Jordan but passing several MTRs on the way for a fare of eight dollars. I was so happy to get on and sink down into my seat.

Flame Trees.

Flame Trees.

Flame Trees.

Flame Trees.

Flame Trees.

Flame Trees.

At the bus-stop.

At the bus-stop.

Making a meal, making a mess.

Making a meal, making a mess.

Making a meal, making a mess.

Making a meal, making a mess.

I was expecting to take the red minibus to Jordan or Mong Kok, but he stopped somewhere I've never been before and pointed out an MTR sign. I had no idea where I was, but jumped off anyway. Once you are at an MTR, you can get anywhere. I turned out to be in Sham Shiu Po, which is famous for its markets. I had also spotted an area where it was possible to walk up a slope and photo the high up flowers of cotton trees from it, so I went there and photographed some trees. Then I had a very quick look at one market. I was too tired to seek them all out.

Celebrating the Year of the Ox, Sham Shui Po.

Celebrating the Year of the Ox, Sham Shui Po.

Celebrating the Year of the Ox, Sham Shui Po.

Celebrating the Year of the Ox, Sham Shui Po.

Sham Shui Po Market.

Sham Shui Po Market.

Sham Shui Po Market.

Sham Shui Po Market.

Sham Shui Po Market.

Sham Shui Po Market.

Sham Shui Po Market.

Sham Shui Po Market.

Sham Shui Po Market.

Sham Shui Po Market.

Sham Shui Po Market.

Sham Shui Po Market.

Bauhinia.

Bauhinia.

Cotton Tree.

Cotton Tree.

Cotton Tree.

Cotton Tree.

Cotton Tree.

Cotton Tree.

Cotton Tree.

Cotton Tree.

Cotton Tree.

Cotton Tree.

Cotton Tree.

Cotton Tree.

Cotton Tree.

Cotton Tree.

Cotton Tree.

Cotton Tree.

Cotton Tree.

Cotton Tree.

Finally, I returned home to Discovery Bay where there were even more beautiful trees. I loved their amazingly sunny and happy yellow flowers.

Flowering Tree, Discovery Bay.

Flowering Tree, Discovery Bay.

Flowering Tree, Discovery Bay.

Flowering Tree, Discovery Bay.

Posted by irenevt 12:30 Archived in Hong Kong Comments (7)

A Room with a View.

A Night in the Regal Hong Kong Hotel.

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Unfortunately, it is nearing the end of my holiday. Work is once again raising its ugly head. We decided for our final weekend of freedom, we would go on a one night staycation, so we booked a room in the Regal Hong Kong Hotel in Causeway Bay. Social distancing has been slightly eased here so restaurants are now allowed to open until 10pm, because of that, we decided to book an executive room with access to the club class lounge. The room plus lounge, plus breakfast cost HK$740 which is amazingly cheap. The only downside was that although this hotel has a rooftop pool, swimming pools are still all closed here, so we could not use it, could not even get to see it in fact.

Just outside the hotel is the Olympic Stairway which displays the dates and locations of Olympic games and some murals of Olympic scenes.

Olympic Stairway.

Olympic Stairway.

Olympic Stairway.

Olympic Stairway.

Olympic Stairway.

Olympic Stairway.

Our room was on the thirty-fourth floor of the hotel and had huge windows on two sides, so the views from it were amazing, even the bathroom had a spectacular view. In one direction we could gaze out over Causeway Bay and Victoria Harbour and in the other we could see right across Victoria Park and Tin Hau.

Hotel Lobby.

Hotel Lobby.

Our Room.

Our Room.

Our Room.

Our Room.

Our Bathroom.

Our Bathroom.

Beautiful View.

Beautiful View.

Beautiful View.

Beautiful View.

Beautiful View.

Beautiful View.

We made ourselves comfortable in the room, which sadly meant drawing all the curtains as they let in so much light and heat it was dazzling. Then we went for a coffee in the club lounge on the thirty-first floor. This faced the other way from our room. It looked out over mountains, a quarry and St Paul's Convent School. I was interested to see its chapel from above. I don't think members of the public can go there.

In the Lounge.

In the Lounge.

View from the Lounge.

View from the Lounge.

I wasn't feeling too full of energy as I had spent the morning cleaning my house before going to the hotel, so I decided to have a lazy day relaxing and enjoying our room. I just went out for a short walk around Victoria Park. I mainly wanted to take some photos of the plants, trees and the little statues that are dotted around the gardens. I was also pleased to see many things that have been closed for such a long time were beginning to reopen such as the model boat pond, which finally had water and people sailing their boats, the basketball courts and the football pitch, both of which were filled with people playing games or exercising.

Bauhinia Tree.

Bauhinia Tree.

Beautiful Trees.

Beautiful Trees.

Bouganvillia.

Bouganvillia.

Hibiscus.

Hibiscus.

Beautiful Flowers.

Beautiful Flowers.

Flame Tree .

Flame Tree .

Beautiful Flowers.

Beautiful Flowers.

Azalea.

Azalea.

Azalea.

Azalea.

Affectionate Frogs.

Affectionate Frogs.

Bird Statue.

Bird Statue.

Horse Statues.

Horse Statues.

Model Boat Pond.

Model Boat Pond.

Model Boat Pond.

Model Boat Pond.

After looking at the park I went back in time to watch the sunset from our room. It was very pretty as it slowly painted the skies above Causeway Bay red.

Beautiful Sunset.

Beautiful Sunset.

Beautiful Sunset.

Beautiful Sunset.

Beautiful Sunset.

Beautiful Sunset.

Beautiful Sunset.

Beautiful Sunset.

Then we returned to the club lounge for snacks and drinks. They were serving salmon sandwiches, chicken wings and strawberry cheesecake. We also had beer and white wine.

The Club Lounge.

The Club Lounge.

The Club Lounge.

The Club Lounge.

After visiting the lounge, we returned to our room and had a look at the nighttime view when the world around us was all lit up with colourful neon lights. We left the curtains open all night to fully enjoy it.

Night Time View.

Night Time View.

Night Time View.

Night Time View.

Night Time View.

Night Time View.

Night Time View.

Night Time View.

In the room at night.

In the room at night.

Next day we had breakfast in the hotel. It should have been good, but the food on the buffet was all freezing cold. In our scientifically advanced world you would think someone could design a buffet system that actually kept food warm, but they don't seem to have. The dining room itself was very fancy and the most fun part was trying to take a selfie of both of us using the reflection from all the glass and mirrors around us.

Dining-Room.

Dining-Room.

Decorations.

Decorations.

Me at breakfast.

Me at breakfast.

Peter at breakfast.

Peter at breakfast.

Selfie Time.

Selfie Time.

After breakfast I decided to take the MTR to Admiralty and take the South Island Line to Lei Tung Station. Lei Tung is on the Island of Ap Lei Chau, which is on the other side of the channel from Aberdeen which I visited when I climbed Brick Hill.

Ap Lei Chau is the third most densely populated island in the world. Its name, when translated literally, means Duck Tongue Island, due to its shape. Ap Lei Chau started out as home to small fishing villages. Later in 1968 Hongkong Electric opened a power station here, but this was relocated to Lamma Island in 1989 and the site of the power station was redeveloped into a residential area known as South Horizons. In 1983, a bridge was constructed to join Ap Lei Chau to Hong Kong Island. This paved the way for more housing to be located here.

I exited Lei Tung station and headed towards the waterfront. There is a walkway along the front with beautiful views across the boat filled waters of Aberdeen Harbour. Just like on the Aberdeen mainland side, there are lots of gardens here and statues related to the Tanka Boat People, who were the island's original inhabitants. There are also two beautiful temples, a wind tower and great views over the floating restaurants.

Beautiful Trees.

Beautiful Trees.

Beautiful Trees.

Beautiful Trees.

Beautiful Trees.

Beautiful Trees.

Hibiscus.

Hibiscus.

Gardens.

Gardens.

Decorations.

Decorations.

Fisherman Statue.

Fisherman Statue.

Fish Sellers Statues.

Fish Sellers Statues.

Boat Sculpture.

Boat Sculpture.

Dragon Boat Sculpture.

Dragon Boat Sculpture.

Dragon Boaters.

Dragon Boaters.

Dragon Boaters.

Dragon Boaters.

Dragon Boaters.

Dragon Boaters.

Lighthouse.

Lighthouse.

Lighthouse.

Lighthouse.

Waterfront.

Waterfront.

Waterfront.

Waterfront.

Waterfront.

Waterfront.

Waterfront.

Waterfront.

Waterfront.

Waterfront.

Floating Restaurants at the Waterfront.

Floating Restaurants at the Waterfront.

Waterfront.

Waterfront.

Waterfront.

Waterfront.

Waterfront..

Waterfront..

Waterfront.

Waterfront.

Flying Kites.

Flying Kites.

Wind Tower Park.

Wind Tower Park.

Wind Tower.

Wind Tower.

Good Luck Symbol in the Park.

Good Luck Symbol in the Park.

There is a busy temple near the sea front called Hung Shing Temple. It dates back to 1773, making it the oldest temple in the Aberdeen and Ap Lei Chau.

Hung Shing Temple.

Hung Shing Temple.

Hung Shing Temple.

Hung Shing Temple.

Hung Shing Temple.

Hung Shing Temple.

Hung Shing Temple.

Hung Shing Temple.

Hung Shing Temple.

Hung Shing Temple.

Hung Shing Temple.

Hung Shing Temple.

Hung Shing Temple.

Hung Shing Temple.

Hung Shing Temple.

Hung Shing Temple.

Hung Shing Temple.

Hung Shing Temple.

Hung Shing Temple.

Hung Shing Temple.

Hung Shing Temple.

Hung Shing Temple.

Another temple a bit further along is called the Shui Yuet Temple, which dates from the end of the nineteenth century. It has an interesting tree in front of it. It is dedicated to Kuan Yin, goddess of mercy. There was a Taoist priest performing rituals during my visit.

Shui Yuet Temple.

Shui Yuet Temple.

Shui Yuet Temple.

Shui Yuet Temple.

Shui Yuet Temple.

Shui Yuet Temple.

Shui Yuet Temple.

Shui Yuet Temple.

Shui Yuet Temple.

Shui Yuet Temple.

Shui Yuet Temple.

Shui Yuet Temple.

Shui Yuet Temple.

Shui Yuet Temple.

Shui Yuet Temple.

Shui Yuet Temple.

Before leaving Ap Lei Chau, I had a look at Ap Lei Chau main street which had some interesting looking old shops and restaurants. I also liked its murals in the MTR which were all related to fishing and the sea. Then I headed back to the hotel for final club class drinks, a last look at the view and check out.

Shops.

Shops.

Shops.

Shops.

Shops.

Shops.

Shops.

Shops.

Shops.

Shops.

Shops.

Shops.

Shops.

Shops.

In the MTR station.

In the MTR station.

In the MTR station.

In the MTR station.

In the MTR station.

In the MTR station.

Final Drink Before Check-out.

Final Drink Before Check-out.

Final Drink Before Check-out.

Final Drink Before Check-out.

Final Drink Before Check-out.

Final Drink Before Check-out.

Posted by irenevt 00:27 Archived in Hong Kong Comments (11)

Riding the Trails.

Following Sir Cecil's Ride from Quarry Bay to Braemar Hill.

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I walked the Quarry Bay Tree Walk the other day and on route I noticed sign posts for Sir Cecil's Ride. This interested me as I recognized the name as a walk that passes near my school. While I have heard people at work mention it, I have never actually walked it, until today. In fact it is a very long walk and I only walked part of it, which I think is fair enough, as I can always do the other part later and as, unlike Sir Cecil, I wasn't on a horse!

Sir Cecil's Ride is named after Sir Cecil Clemanti, the seventeenth governor of Hong Kong. He was born in Kanpur, India on 1st September 1875 and died in High Wycombe, United Kingdom, on 5th April 1947. Sir Cecil served as Governor of Hong Kong from 1925 to 1930. He was fluent in Cantonese and Mandarin. Among other achievements here, Sir Cecil established Kai Tak Airport, which was in use until 1998. He was also one of the people who helped found the University of Hong Kong. He even wrote the words of the University Anthem which was performed at the university's opening ceremony on 11th March 1912. He was married to Marie Penelope Rose Eyres - Lady Clemanti. Together they had three daughters and one son. Both Sir Cecil and Lady Clemanti were keen horse riders and both have trails that they once loved to ride here named after them.

To get to Sir Cecil's Ride in Quarry Bay exit the MTR at exit A and turn right. Walk along King's Road until Mount Parker Road, proceed up the hill, you'll see signs for Sir Cecil's Ride on the right hand side, shortly after the Woodside Centre for Biodiversity. I took another photo of Woodside as it had been too sunny to take a good picture on my last visit. I also noticed a beautiful cotton tree just outside Woodside's grounds. I love cotton trees. I would have to say they are my favourite tree here as their flowers are just beautiful. Once their flowers fall off, they produce thousands of white seeds which cover the ground in a blanket that resembles snow or cotton wool, hence the name.

Cotton tree the flowers were way too high up to see properly.

Cotton tree the flowers were way too high up to see properly.

Woodside.

Woodside.

The beginning of the Sir Cecil's Ride is clearly signposted but there are not too many sign posts later on. I've read so many varying accounts of this walk, I suspect everyone was doing a slightly different one. The route I chose started with rather a lot of stairs, not in one enormous staircase, but spread over several with the odd flat bit in between. Every so often there was a sitting area with a shelter and a little shrine. One shrine even had a little pool filled with golden carp. I found all these distractions helped take my mind off the steps. Eventually I reached a bridge over a stream. The water level was very low. I did not cross the stream as that way seemed to be a different trail. Next to the bridge there was a huge statue of Kuan Yin, goddess of mercy.

Sir Cecil's Ride.

Sir Cecil's Ride.

Steps Up.

Steps Up.

Kuan Yin.

Kuan Yin.

Little Shrines.

Little Shrines.

Little Shrines.

Little Shrines.

Stream.

Stream.

Bamboo.

Bamboo.

Colourful Plants.

Colourful Plants.

Mountain View.

Mountain View.

Once I had dealt with all the stairs the path levelled out. Occasionally there was a glimpse of a view through the trees. Turning back there were often views of the mountains. I found many beautiful Chinese New Year flowers. These were quite hard to photograph as they always seemed to be just slightly too far over a steep edge.

Mountain Scenery.

Mountain Scenery.

Chinese New Year Flowers.

Chinese New Year Flowers.

After a while when I was getting frustrated with just glimpses of views, I suddenly saw a sign for a view compass, so I climbed the stairs up to it and wow! It was amazing because I could see so many directions at the same time. I don't think photos do it justice. It was the best view point in Hong Kong I have ever seen.

Views from the View Compass.

Views from the View Compass.

Views from the View Compass.

Views from the View Compass.

Views from the View Compass.

Views from the View Compass.

Views from the View Compass.

Views from the View Compass.

Views from the View Compass.

Views from the View Compass.

Views from the View Compass.

Views from the View Compass.

Views from the View Compass.

Views from the View Compass.

Views from the View Compass.

Views from the View Compass.

Views from the View Compass.

Views from the View Compass.

After a long time spent gazing in awe at the view, I eventually tore myself away and continued on route towards Braemar Hill. I loved the rock formations I encountered on the path and I found more Chinese New Year flowers.

Rocky Paths.

Rocky Paths.

Rocky Paths.

Rocky Paths.

Rocky Paths.

Rocky Paths.

Rocky Paths.

Rocky Paths.

Rocky Paths.

Rocky Paths.

Rocky Paths.

Rocky Paths.

Rocky Paths.

Rocky Paths.

Rocky Paths.

Rocky Paths.

Rocky Paths.

Rocky Paths.

Chinese New Year Flowers.

Chinese New Year Flowers.

Chinese New Year Flowers.

Chinese New Year Flowers.

Chinese New Year Flowers.

Chinese New Year Flowers.

Eventually I reached a sort of cave like rock formation. This was just before I reached the stream and waterfall section of my walk, which is just above my school.

Cave like Rock Formation.

Cave like Rock Formation.

The stream area was very pretty though, as we have had little rain recently, the water levels were very low.

Bridge over the stream.

Bridge over the stream.

At the Stream.

At the Stream.

At the Stream.

At the Stream.

At the Stream.

At the Stream.

At the Stream.

At the Stream.

At the Stream.

At the Stream.

At the Stream.

At the Stream.

At the Stream.

At the Stream.

At the Stream.

At the Stream.

There is a well known view point in this area, but I had forgotten the instructions for how to get to it. It didn't matter anyway, as it's only about twenty minutes from where I work. I did however find a different view point on a somewhat precarious ledge which also had some more beautiful Chinese New Year flowers.

View from a Ledge.

View from a Ledge.

View from a Ledge.

View from a Ledge.

View from a Ledge.

View from a Ledge.

Chinese New Year Flowers.

Chinese New Year Flowers.

View from a Ledge with Chinese New Year Flowers.

View from a Ledge with Chinese New Year Flowers.

View from a Ledge with Chinese New Year Flowers.

View from a Ledge with Chinese New Year Flowers.

In fact this area was filled with beautiful plants. I even found some lovely pitcher plants. To my delight I also thought I saw another lovely cotton tree but on closer examination it was an equally lovely flame tree..

Colourful Plants.

Colourful Plants.

Beautiful Wild Flowers.

Beautiful Wild Flowers.

Pitcher Plant.

Pitcher Plant.

Pitcher Plant.

Pitcher Plant.

Pitcher Plant.

Pitcher Plant.

Flame Tree.

Flame Tree.

I then wandered down from Sir Cecil's Ride and returned to civilization. Within a few minutes, I was in front of my school building. Argh!!! I hurried past. It's too early to be back there. I considered taking transport down the hill, but didn't. After all, I walk down here to the MTR every day. On the walk down I passed another cotton tree with high up flowers, but one had fallen, or been placed, conveniently on a wall, the perfect ending photo to a lovely walk.

Flower from a Cotton Tree.

Flower from a Cotton Tree.

Posted by irenevt 14:57 Archived in Hong Kong Comments (7)

Can't See the Wood for the Trees.

Quarry Bay Tree Walk.

sunny

Yesterday I tried to do the Tsz Lo Lan Shan Trail again. I got a bit closer. The queue for the number 6 bus was moderate when I arrived. I couldn't get on the first bus. I would have got on the second. I waited and waited for a driver and the queue behind me grew and grew. I must admit I had woken up in a grumpy impatient mood and standing there breathing in the exhaust fumes from the other buses and thinking about travelling on a bus that was sure to be packed solid in the midst of a pandemic just did not appeal to me, so I ducked under the fence and quit the line-up and headed off to do the Quarry Bay Tree Walk instead.

Getting to this walk is extremely easy. I just got on the MTR and got off at Quarry Bay, took exit A and turned right along King's Road. Within a couple of minutes there was a sign pointing up Mount Parker Road. This is the starting point for several different walks. The Quarry Bay Tree Walk is probably the easiest one, but it's still beautiful and historically very interesting, too.

Inside Quarry Bay MTR Station.

Inside Quarry Bay MTR Station.

The first sight on this road is a colourful, little shrine on Mount Parker Road itself.

Mount Parker Road Shrine.

Mount Parker Road Shrine.

Mount Parker Road Shrine.

Mount Parker Road Shrine.

I continued up the road and after five or ten minutes arrived at Woodside Biodiversity Education Centre. This beautiful old building was originally built as a residence for senior staff of the Taikoo Sugar Refinery in the 1920's. Taikoo is the Chinese name for Swire, a huge conglomerate, that owns the land around here. Historically this area was the site of the Taikoo Dockyards, Taikoo Sugar Refinery and Swire Coca-Cola plant. When the sugar refinery ceased operations, Woodside House firstly became a space for exhibitions and concerts, then in 2012 it became the Woodside Biodiversity Education Centre, which teaches about wildlife in Hong Kong. I'd have loved to go in, mainly to see the inside of the building, but unfortunately it is shut due to covid, well isn't everything? There were some beautiful orange trees in the gardens here.

Woodside Biodiversity Centre.

Woodside Biodiversity Centre.

Woodside Biodiversity Centre.

Woodside Biodiversity Centre.

Woodside Biodiversity Centre.

Woodside Biodiversity Centre.

Woodside Biodiversity Centre.

Woodside Biodiversity Centre.

Orange Trees.

Orange Trees.

Orange Trees.

Orange Trees.

A little past Woodside, on the left, I saw the entrance to the Quarry Bay Tree Walk, so I left everyone else to continue their long struggles on the uphill walks and entered a level, shaded paradise. At once my bleak spirits were lifted and I felt happy once more.

Quarry Bay Tree Walk.

Quarry Bay Tree Walk.

The Quarry Bay Tree Walk obviously has lots of trees, but it also has much more. It has little streams, small waterfalls, flowers, interesting rock formations and lots of historical remains from World War II.

A couple of minutes into the trail I saw a ruined building covered with tree roots. There was no information about it, but due to its location it is bound to be something to do with the war.

Ruined Building.

Ruined Building.

Ruined Building.

Ruined Building.

Ruined Building.

Ruined Building.

Just past that, on the right hand side, I saw the mouth of a cave. This was probably one of the caves used as a storage area for food supplies during the war.

Cave.

Cave.

Cave.

Cave.

Cave.

Cave.

Then, a little further along I came to the first of four areas here which are lined with rows of wartime stoves.

When Japan captured Guangzhou on Mainland China in 1938, Hong Kong began to prepare for a possible invasion of its territory. One of the many preparations was to create lines of stone stoves, stockpiles of provisions and air-raid shelters in the hills above Quarry Bay, as the area around Quarry Bay and Shau Kei Wan was at that time one of the most densely populated in Hong Kong. The Japanese eventually attacked Hong Kong in December 1941 and captured the city after an extremely bloody eighteen day battle. Hong Kong surrendered to the Imperial Japanese Army on Christmas Day 1941. The stoves dotted around my walk were never used in the end and now they lie forgotten, neglected and filled with weeds.

Wartime Stoves.

Wartime Stoves.

Wartime Stoves.

Wartime Stoves.

Wartime Stoves.

Wartime Stoves.

After looking at the first set of stoves, I walked on through shady tree lined paths, stopping to admire the occasional flower or plant and the odd view of the mountains through a gap in the trees and then I came to a second area, similar to the first, and covered in wartime stoves.

Wandering the path.

Wandering the path.

Wandering the path.

Wandering the path.

Mountain View.

Mountain View.

Beautiful Flowers. These are called Chinese New Year Flowers.

Beautiful Flowers. These are called Chinese New Year Flowers.

Beautiful Flowers.

Beautiful Flowers.

The Second Set of Stoves.

The Second Set of Stoves.

The Second Set of Stoves.

The Second Set of Stoves.

The Second Set of Stoves.

The Second Set of Stoves.

The Second Set of Stoves.

The Second Set of Stoves.

Close up look inside a Stove.

Close up look inside a Stove.

After viewing these stoves, I kept on following signs for Quarry Bay Tree Route and came to a little bridge across a stream. I noticed another sign leading off to a morning walkers' trail. Sensing I was nearing the end of my walk and unwilling to finish so soon, I decided to head on up there and, guess what? I came to a third set of wartime stoves! After looking at these, I walked down to the stream. It was lined with concrete walkways. I strolled along these till I came to an amazingly peaceful area littered with rocks and huge boulders and filled with little trickling waterfalls. There were several people lazing around chilling here and some children splashing around in the water.

Sign posts.

Sign posts.

Continuing on the Trail.

Continuing on the Trail.

It's a Jungle Out There.

It's a Jungle Out There.

Berries.

Berries.

Colourful Plants.

Colourful Plants.

Flowers.

Flowers.

Moss Covered Rock.

Moss Covered Rock.

Bridge Over Stream.

Bridge Over Stream.

Bridge Over Stream.

Bridge Over Stream.

Top of the Bridge.

Top of the Bridge.

Morning Walkers' Trail.

Morning Walkers' Trail.

Looking inside at third set of stoves.

Looking inside at third set of stoves.

Third Set of Ovens.

Third Set of Ovens.

Rocky Stream.

Rocky Stream.

Rocky Stream.

Rocky Stream.

Walking along the Sides of the Stream.

Walking along the Sides of the Stream.

The Stream.

The Stream.

Huge Boulders in the Stream.

Huge Boulders in the Stream.

Boulder Strewn Stream.

Boulder Strewn Stream.

Stream.

Stream.

Boulder Strewn Stream.

Boulder Strewn Stream.

After wandering along the stream, I returned to the bridge and headed across it. On the other side there was a barbecue site, naturally it was closed at the moment. At this site there were additional ovens, though only two survived at this spot. The best thing about the barbecue site though was there was a massive sleeping wild boar here and not far from it roamed its more active companion who was scavenging for food. People were nervously photographing it and it was blissfully ignoring all of us. Every now and then it would step a little closer to us in its search for food and we would all gasp and take a step backwards.

Barbecue Site.

Barbecue Site.

Only two stoves remain here.

Only two stoves remain here.

Wild Boar.

Wild Boar.

Wild Boar.

Wild Boar.

Wild Boar.

Wild Boar.

Wild Boar.

Wild Boar.

After watching the boars for some time, I wandered on. I was nearing the end of the walk now, but saw a couple more overgrown remains which again I'm assuming date from war time, though I really don't know. I also saw a cute little bird and lots of beautiful, colourful flowers. Some of the flowers were wild flowers on the walk and some were in the residential areas around Kornhill where the walk ends

More root covered remains.

More root covered remains.

Bird, possibly an oriental magpie robin.

Bird, possibly an oriental magpie robin.

Hibiscus.

Hibiscus.

Hibiscus.

Hibiscus.

Hibiscus.

Hibiscus.

Flowers.

Flowers.

Flowers.

Flowers.

Bauhinia.

Bauhinia.

Flowers.

Flowers.

Flowers.

Flowers.

More Remains.

More Remains.

Back in civilisation I was greeted with the sight of graffiti, shiny glass buildings, residential blocks and a colourful school.

Colourful School.

Colourful School.

Walk Finished OK.

Walk Finished OK.

Shiny Buildings.

Shiny Buildings.

I got on the MTR and headed towards Tung Chung to do some shopping before going home. At Tung Chung I noted a couple of stained glass decorations that I liked the look of.

Tung Chung.

Tung Chung.

Tung Chung.

Tung Chung.

Tung Chung.

Tung Chung.

Posted by irenevt 12:40 Archived in Hong Kong Comments (6)

Bricks and Water.

Climbing Brick Hill and Wandering around Aberdeen.

sunny

Yesterday I set out to walk the Tsz Lo Lan Shan Path from Wong Nai Cheung Reservoir to Tai Tam Tuk Reservoir, but it was not to be. When I arrived at Exchange Square Bus Station to board the number 6 bus to the start of the walk, I was greeted by chaos. The queue for the bus snaked round and round. Every now and then as a bus prepared to leave, the people at the front stopped boarding, preferring to wait for the next bus where they'd definitely get a seat. This in turn caused those at the back of the queue, who knew they'd be standing in line for hours, to surge forward and fight to get on. People were pushing, screaming, jumping barriers. It all looked rather insane. I could think of nothing worse than joining this melee, so I had to replan my day. I decided to go and climb Nam Long Shan.

Nam Long Shan is known in English as Brick Hill and to get to the start of this walk I only had to get to Wong Chuk Hang MTR Station on the South Island Line. Getting anywhere in Hong Kong by MTR is easy and fast, so it was obviously the sensible thing to do.

Wong Chuk Hang literally means Yellow Bamboo Grove. Hong Kong is mainly mountainous, but there was some flat land in this area, so as far back as the 1860's Wong Chuk Hang became home to a small farming community who grew crops and raised livestock. Later, after the Second World War, Mainland Chinese refugees flooded into Hong Kong and many new textiles, electronics and plastics factories were set up here. By the late 1980's there were almost two thousand factories in Wong Chuk Hang. Gradually, over the course of the next decade or so, these factories began to relocate to Guangdong where labour costs were cheaper and Wong Chuk Hang went into a state of decline. However, its fortunes changed again when the MTR decided to build the South Island Line and open a station here. The area's new accessibility made it a much more desirable place to live and a process of gentrification began. Wong Chuk Hang nowadays has lots of cutting-edge art galleries, showrooms, and creative studios.

I exited the station through exit B and found myself in front of the Tai Wong Ye Temple. I am not knowledgeable about Taoism but have been visiting a lot of Chinese temples recently. It seems to me, and apologies if I'm wrong, that most Chinese gods and goddesses were actually real people who did something good or kind or brave in their lifetime then were deified after their death. There seem to be several stories about Tai Wong Ye. One story describes him as the god of plague, who once saved people from a fatal epidemic, quite fitting nowadays. Another story regards him as the patron saint of fishermen. Either way his temple was well worth a visit. The temple is located at the junction of Heung Yip and Nam Long Shan Roads at a place where a statue of Tai Wong Ye was discovered in the early 1900's.

Tai Wong Ye Temple.

Tai Wong Ye Temple.

Tai Wong Ye Temple.

Tai Wong Ye Temple.

Tai Wong Ye Temple.

Tai Wong Ye Temple.

Tai Wong Ye Temple.

Tai Wong Ye Temple.

Tai Wong Ye Temple.

Tai Wong Ye Temple.

Tai Wong Ye Temple.

Tai Wong Ye Temple.

Tai Wong Ye Temple.

Tai Wong Ye Temple.

Tai Wong Ye Temple.

Tai Wong Ye Temple.

To start my hike I walked past the Nam Long Shan Cooked Food Market onto Nam Long Shan Road and turned right. The road sloped gradually uphill and I soon reached a bus station and the Singapore International School. I passed the front of this building and soon reached the Canadian International School followed by the Leo Lee Art Centre. Soon I was at a viewpoint with spectacular views over Aberdeen Marina.

Aberdeen Marina.

Aberdeen Marina.

Aberdeen Marina.

Aberdeen Marina.

Aberdeen Marina.

Aberdeen Marina.

Aberdeen Marina.

Aberdeen Marina.

A short distance after the viewpoint there is a stairway with a sign-post marked Nam Long Shan Rest Garden 50 metres. This is the beginning of the Nam Long Shan Hike. Nam Long Shan is called Brick Hill in English, perhaps because of its brick-coloured, reddish soil. The southern slope of this hill is occupied by Ocean Park. Every post I read about this hike mentions hearing the excited screams from the people enjoying the rides in Ocean Park, but, of course due to covid, Ocean Park is currently shut. Just as I was about to start walking on the trail, I saw a wild boar on the other side of the road, but it had gone before I could photograph it. Later I saw a mummy boar snuggled up in the shade with her two babies, so I got my photo after all. At the rest garden there is a pagoda with some seats. Behind it there is a long staircase and I began my upwards climb. This long first set of steps are regular and very easy to walk on.

Everything I have read describes this as an easy trail, but yesterday was extremely hot and one disadvantage of this walk was it has very little shade. Any time there was shade, three thousand Hong Kongers were already occupying it. Needless to say I ended up rather sun struck. It was still a fantastic walk though as the stunning views made up for any discomforts.

Sign Post.

Sign Post.

Nam Long Shan Rest Garden.

Nam Long Shan Rest Garden.

Wild Boars.

Wild Boars.

Views.

Views.

Views.

Views.

Views.

Views.

One of the things I liked most about this walk was that there were little paths where you could step off the stairway and look over the views. Dotted around these paths were large numbers of little shrines, filled with images of gods and goddesses, Buddhas, incense and offerings.

Shrines.

Shrines.

Shrines.

Shrines.

Shrines.

Shrines.

Shrines.

Shrines.

Shrines.

Shrines.

Shrines.

Shrines.

Shrines.

Shrines.

Shrines.

Shrines.

Shrines.

Shrines.

Shrines.

Shrines.

The regular stairs lead up to a crowded pavilion with wonderful views in all directions. There were some beautiful flowering trees here, too.

The Pavilion on the way up wasn't too bad.

The Pavilion on the way up wasn't too bad.

But on the way down. Hey you, get out of my shade.

But on the way down. Hey you, get out of my shade.

Beautiful Views from the Pavilion.

Beautiful Views from the Pavilion.

Beautiful Views from the Pavilion.

Beautiful Views from the Pavilion.

Beautiful Views from the Pavilion.

Beautiful Views from the Pavilion.

Beautiful Views from the Pavilion.

Beautiful Views from the Pavilion.

Beautiful Views from the Pavilion.

Beautiful Views from the Pavilion.

The next stretch of the walk was harder to walk on as the stairs were more basic and were broken in parts. There were several beautiful flowers here and lots of butterflies. Again there were many shrines and interesting rock formations which I think will end up as shrines. There were also lines of prayer flags blowing in the wind, making me feel like I was in Nepal or Tibet and, of course, there were more stunning views. Whenever there was a flat area at the side of the steps, everyone was taking photos.

These stairs are harder to walk on.

These stairs are harder to walk on.

Rough Stairs.

Rough Stairs.

Flowers.

Flowers.

Berries.

Berries.

Flowers and Butterflies. Apparently the flower is known as a fried egg flower and the butterfly is a Jezebel butterfly.

Flowers and Butterflies. Apparently the flower is known as a fried egg flower and the butterfly is a Jezebel butterfly.

Beautiful Flowers.

Beautiful Flowers.

Whenever there is a flat area everyone is taking photos.

Whenever there is a flat area everyone is taking photos.

Whenever there is a flat area everyone is taking photos.

Whenever there is a flat area everyone is taking photos.

At times the path gets crowded.

At times the path gets crowded.

Prayer Flags.

Prayer Flags.

Prayer Flags.

Prayer Flags.

Prayer Flags.

Prayer Flags.

A Shrine in the making.

A Shrine in the making.

A Shrine in the making.

A Shrine in the making.

A Shrine in the making.

A Shrine in the making.

This is where I am heading.

This is where I am heading.

Views.

Views.

Views.

Views.

Looking down on Ocean Park.

Looking down on Ocean Park.

The rough stairs continued for a while, then became a rough reddish path which finally reached a helipad. From the helipad there were sensational views including some looking out over Deep Water Bay and Repulse Bay and some looking over Lamma Island.

On the Helipad.

On the Helipad.

On the Helipad.

On the Helipad.

On the Helipad.

On the Helipad.

View over Deep Water Bay.

View over Deep Water Bay.

View over Deep Water Bay.

View over Deep Water Bay.

View over Deep Water Bay.

View over Deep Water Bay.

View over Deep Water Bay.

View over Deep Water Bay.

View over Deep Water Bay.

View over Deep Water Bay.

View over Deep Water Bay.

View over Deep Water Bay.

View over Lamma Island.

View over Lamma Island.

View over Lamma Island.

View over Lamma Island.

View Over Lamma Island.

View Over Lamma Island.

Then there was a final set of regular stairs to the very top of the hill. Brick Hill is 284 metres high. Its summit is covered with cell towers, antennas and control stations, but you can slip past these to see more views. There is a trignometrical station right at the back of the summit.

The final set of stairs to the top.

The final set of stairs to the top.

View over Helipad and Ocean Park.

View over Helipad and Ocean Park.

View over Ocean Park and the Helipad.

View over Ocean Park and the Helipad.

The Trigonometrical Station.

The Trigonometrical Station.

Coming Back down.

Coming Back down.

Coming Back down.

Coming Back down.

Coming Back down.

Coming Back down.

I really had way too much sun on this walk. The only sensible thing I could do was get into the shade and cool down, but, although I knew this, I foolishly continued on towards Aberdeen to take a look around there, too.

Aberdeen is named in memory of George Hamilton-Gordon, 4th Earl of Aberdeen in Scotland. It is famous for its floating villages and floating seafood restaurants and was historically home to the boat dwelling Tanka people. Prior to being called Aberdeen, this area was known as Hong Kong Tsuen, which means Fragrant Harbour Village as it traded in incense trees. In the early nineteenth century foreign sailors who landed near this village mistakenly thought this name referred to the whole island and that's how Hong Kong got its name.

I began by looking at Aberdeen Marina. On the way there I passed a school that was beautifully decorated for Chinese New Year plus had a fantastic display of artwork.

Artistic School.

Artistic School.

Artistic School.

Artistic School.

Artistic School.

Artistic School.

Artistic School.

Artistic School.

Artistic School.

Artistic School.

Right in the middle of Aberdeen Harbour, just behind the marina, is the Jumbo Kingdom. This consists of two floating restaurants: the Tai Pak Restaurant which dates back to 1957 and the Jumbo Restaurant which was built in 1976. In 1971 shortly after construction of the Jumbo Restaurant began, a huge fire broke out killing 34 people and leaving 42 badly injured. This deterred the owner from completing the project. He sold the restaurants to Macau businessman Stanley Ho. The restaurants are designed to look like Ancient Chinese imperial palaces. They are built on huge rafts and attached by a walkway. The Jumbo alone cost HK$30 million to build and can house two thousand diners at one time. You can get to the restaurant by a free boat from Shum Wan Pier. Famous people who have dined here include Queen Elizabeth II, Tom Cruise, David Bowie, Gong Li and Bruce Lee.

Jumbo Restaurant from The Marina.

Jumbo Restaurant from The Marina.

The Marina.

The Marina.

The Marina.

The Marina.

The Marina.

The Marina.

The Marina.

The Marina.

I had hoped to be able to walk along the marina all the way to the promenade, and maybe you can, but part of the way along, I reached a part that looked blocked off and had ferocious barking dogs. I'm not sure if they could have got out and I wasn't prepared to find out so I beat a hasty retreat and headed back to the MTR and approached the promenade down a waterway from there. On the way I passed a stall selling paper offerings. Chinese people buy paper models of things: houses, mobile phones, cars, then burn them in the belief that they will go to their ancestors, ensuring they have all the mod cons in the afterlife. I also saw a very fancy looking church on the hill and a beautiful flowering bauhinia tree.

From the MTR.

From the MTR.

Walkway to Aberdeen from Wong Chuk hang MTR.

Walkway to Aberdeen from Wong Chuk hang MTR.

Paper Offerings.

Paper Offerings.

Paper Offerings.

Paper Offerings.

Holy Spirit Seminary.

Holy Spirit Seminary.

Beautiful Bauhinia Tree.

Beautiful Bauhinia Tree.

One of the best things to do in Aberdeen is to stroll along its promenade which is lined with boats, including many house boats and fish stalls. It is possible to catch a sampan to Ap Lei Chau from here or a ferry to Lamma Island. On the inner land side of the promenade there are gardens, seating areas, statues, a dragon boat and displays about life in old Aberdeen.

House Boats.

House Boats.

House Boats.

House Boats.

House Boats.

House Boats.

House Boats.

House Boats.

House Boats.

House Boats.

House Boats.

House Boats.

On the Promenade.

On the Promenade.

On the Promenade.

On the Promenade.

On the Promenade.

On the Promenade.

On the Promenade.

On the Promenade.

On the Promenade.

On the Promenade.

On the Promenade.

On the Promenade.

On the Promenade.

On the Promenade.

On the Promenade.

On the Promenade.

On the Promenade.

On the Promenade.

On the Promenade.

On the Promenade.

On the Promenade.

On the Promenade.

On the Promenade.

On the Promenade.

On the Promenade.

On the Promenade.

On the Promenade.

On the Promenade.

On the Promenade.

On the Promenade.

On the Promenade.

On the Promenade.

Old Pictures of Aberdeen.

Old Pictures of Aberdeen.

Old Pictures of Aberdeen

Old Pictures of Aberdeen

Old Pictures of Aberdeen.

Old Pictures of Aberdeen.

Fish Market.

Fish Market.

Fish Market.

Fish Market.

Fish Market.

Fish Market.

Fisherman Statue on the Promenade.

Fisherman Statue on the Promenade.

Fishermen Statue on the Promenade.

Fishermen Statue on the Promenade.

Anchor on the Promenade.

Anchor on the Promenade.

Dragon Boat.

Dragon Boat.

Colourful Trees on the Promenade.

Colourful Trees on the Promenade.

When I had finished walking the promenade, I crossed the road using an elevated walkway and looked at Aberdeen Town. It had many shops and restaurants a square known as Aberdeen Square and a beautiful Tin Hau Temple.

Shops in the centre.

Shops in the centre.

Shops in the centre.

Shops in the centre.

Shops in the centre.

Shops in the centre.

Aberdeen Square.

Aberdeen Square.

Aberdeen's Tin Hau Temple was built using funds pooled by the Aberdeen fishermen in 1851. It is dedicated to Tin Hau, goddess of the sea and is very popular with the Tanka people who are traditionally fishermen.

Tin Hau Temple.

Tin Hau Temple.

Tin Hau Temple.

Tin Hau Temple.

Tin Hau Temple.

Tin Hau Temple.

Tin Hau Temple.

Tin Hau Temple.

Tin Hau Temple.

Tin Hau Temple.

Tiger, Tin Hau Temple.

Tiger, Tin Hau Temple.

Dragon, Tin Hau Temple.

Dragon, Tin Hau Temple.

Tin Hau Temple.

Tin Hau Temple.

Although it was not far back to Wong Chuk Hang MTR station, I was really tired and sun struck by this stage, so I jumped on a minibus to Kennedy Town to save me having to walk. I was glad I did as the minibus went round the western coast of Hong Kong Island through Pokfulam and Cyberport and had great views towards Lamma Island.

Posted by irenevt 14:00 Archived in Hong Kong Comments (4)

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