A Travellerspoint blog

A Look around Lantau.

A trip to Tai O and Mui Wo.

sunny

Actually I live in Lantau. It's the biggest island in Hong Kong, but it's nowhere near as populated as Hong Kong Island, as it is very mountainous with very little flat land. Lantau is a lovely place with wonderful hilly scenery, beautiful beaches and lots of fabulous hiking trails.

Today I decided to revisit some parts of Lantau that I like. I started by taking the bus to Tung Chung from where I live, then boarded the number 11 bus to Tai O. The trip to Tai O is quite long, around an hour, but the bus was comfortable and as I went early and on a week day, not crowded. It can be horrendous on a weekend.

Tai O means large inlet and refers to the place where the Tai O Creek merges with the Tai O River. Tai O is populated by the Tanka people. The Tankas are fishermen who traditionally live in houses built on stilts and positioned above tidal flats. Apparently people have lived in Tai O since the Ming dynasty, around 1368 to 1644.

Tai O is famous for seafood and although I wasn't tempted to eat any of it today, I was perfectly happy to photograph some of it as I wandered around Tai O's streets and market.

Tai O Market.

Tai O Market.

Oyster Shells.

Oyster Shells.

Drying seafood and making shrimp paste.

Drying seafood and making shrimp paste.

Dried Fish.

Dried Fish.

Puffer fish.

Puffer fish.

Seafood.

Seafood.

Dried Fish.

Dried Fish.

Seafood.

Seafood.

Seafood.

Seafood.

Shark.

Shark.

Fish and crates.

Fish and crates.

Fishing Nets.

Fishing Nets.

As well as seafood Tai O is famous for stilt houses. The tide was largely out when I visited, so there was lots of mud. I've been here when there's been a lot more water.

Stilt Houses.

Stilt Houses.

Stilt Houses.

Stilt Houses.

Boats and Houses.

Boats and Houses.

Boats and houses.

Boats and houses.

Stilt Houses.

Stilt Houses.

Along the river.

Along the river.

Stilt houses.

Stilt houses.

Boats.

Boats.

Boats and Houses.

Boats and Houses.

Boats and Houses

Boats and Houses

Streets of Tai O.

Streets of Tai O.

Tai O.

Tai O.

Tai O.

Tai O.

Around Tai O.

Around Tai O.

Around Tai O.

Around Tai O.

Tai O River.

Tai O River.

Tai O River.

Tai O River.

Along the River.

Along the River.

Boats at low tide.

Boats at low tide.

Along the River.

Along the River.

Boats and Houses.

Boats and Houses.

Stilt houses when the tide is out.

Stilt houses when the tide is out.

I was pleased to see there were also some signs of Christmas dotted around.

Snowman and reindeer.

Snowman and reindeer.

Christmas tree.

Christmas tree.

Tai O has a nice church and at least three lovely temples.

The church is a Catholic Church called Our Lady of Perpetual Help. It is next door to a primary school.

Our Lady of Perpetual Help Church.

Our Lady of Perpetual Help Church.

Our Lady of Perpetual Help Church.

Our Lady of Perpetual Help Church.

One of the temples is Kwan Tai Temple. This is located in the centre of Tai O on Kat Hing Back Street. Kwan Tai temple is the oldest temple on Lantau Island. It was built in honour of Kwan Tai, a Military General in the Three Kingdoms period, who was famous for his bravery, military tactics and loyalty. He is now regarded as the god of war and righteousness.

Shrine.

Shrine.

Kwan Tai Temple.

Kwan Tai Temple.

Kwan Tai Temple.

Kwan Tai Temple.

Kwan Tai Temple.

Kwan Tai Temple.

Kwan Tai Temple.

Kwan Tai Temple.

Kwan Tai Temple.

Kwan Tai Temple.

A second temple is Hung Shing Temple. This is located in Sha Lo Wan Village, next to Tai O. This temple dates from the eighteenth century. It was built to protect the village from strong winds and lashing waves.

Hung Shing Temple.

Hung Shing Temple.

Hung Shing Temple.

Hung Shing Temple.

Hung Shing Temple.

Hung Shing Temple.

Hung Shing Temple.

Hung Shing Temple.

Hung Shing Temple.

Hung Shing Temple.

It's very windy near the Hung Shing Temple and the sea is quite wild. The scenery here is spectacular. Actually it reminded me very much of Scotland, made me feel quite homesick. There are great views of the Hong Kong–Zhuhai–Macau Bridge. This 55 kilometre bridge was built between 2009 and 2018. It's actually a mixture of three cable-stayed bridges, an undersea tunnel, and four artificial islands. It is the longest sea crossing in the world. It connects Hong Kong, Macau, and Zhuhai together. These are the three major cities on the Pearl River Delta, or at least it would connect them together if anyone could travel between them.

Scenery near Hung Shing Temple.

Scenery near Hung Shing Temple.

Scenery near Hung Shing Temple.

Scenery near Hung Shing Temple.

Scenery near Hung Shing Temple.

Scenery near Hung Shing Temple.

Fisherman and bridge.

Fisherman and bridge.

The bridge to Macau and Zuhai.

The bridge to Macau and Zuhai.

Scenery near Hung Shing Temple.

Scenery near Hung Shing Temple.

Scenery near Hung Shing Temple.

Scenery near Hung Shing Temple.

Another thing I liked about Tai O was that its walls had been covered with brightly coloured paintings which certainly cheered the place up and gave it a lot of character. The first painting I saw showed the Chinese pink dolphin. On weekends there are boat trips to see these, though I've heard the boat trips really just show you round Tai O, rather than find these dolphins. One good thing about covid is that with almost no high speed boats hurtling between Hong Kong and Macau the pink dolphin population is increasing.

Tai O is famous for pink dolphins.

Tai O is famous for pink dolphins.

Outside a local pub.

Outside a local pub.

Painting of Tai O snacks.

Painting of Tai O snacks.

Dragon Boats.

Dragon Boats.

Tourists.

Tourists.

Flying Kites.

Flying Kites.

Chinese Opera.

Chinese Opera.

Painting near Kwan Tai Temple.

Painting near Kwan Tai Temple.

Painting near Kwan Tai Temple.

Painting near Kwan Tai Temple.

Painting near Kwan Tai Temple.

Painting near Kwan Tai Temple.

Flowers.

Flowers.

Rickshaw.

Rickshaw.

Painting on a shutter.

Painting on a shutter.

Dragon Boat Races.

Dragon Boat Races.

Tai O also had some quirky 'works of art' like its models of Snow White looking for a spouse, its fish made of rubbish, presumably to make people more environmentally aware, its flower arrangements and its dancing girl.

Snow White looking for a husband.

Snow White looking for a husband.

Environmental Fish.

Environmental Fish.

Sorry, this seat is taken.

Sorry, this seat is taken.

Dancing Girl. A more quirky side to Tai O.

Dancing Girl. A more quirky side to Tai O.

Hats, Homes and High Seas.

Hats, Homes and High Seas.

All things circular

All things circular

I am also going to add some pictures of things I saw or liked as I wandered around. These include rather large numbers of cats, flowers, houses that I found to be interesting, doorways, windows and bridges.

Window and Washing.

Window and Washing.

Walkway to houses.

Walkway to houses.

Crown of Thorns..

Crown of Thorns..

Bicycle and Balcony.

Bicycle and Balcony.

Cat giving me the evil eye.

Cat giving me the evil eye.

Doorway.

Doorway.

Bridge.

Bridge.

Decorations.

Decorations.

Walkway.

Walkway.

Decorations.

Decorations.

Bicycle and house.

Bicycle and house.

Typical street.

Typical street.

Decorations.

Decorations.

Bridge.

Bridge.

Flower filled streets.

Flower filled streets.

Fishing.

Fishing.

Flowers.

Flowers.

Narrow Streets.

Narrow Streets.

Restaurant.

Restaurant.

Cat on a mission.

Cat on a mission.

Narrow Streets.

Narrow Streets.

Colourful pot plants.

Colourful pot plants.

Sleepy Cat.

Sleepy Cat.

House with colourful tree.

House with colourful tree.

Morning Glory or Railroad Creeper.

Morning Glory or Railroad Creeper.

Fruit Drying.

Fruit Drying.

Then I left Tai O and took bus number 1 to Mui Wo, which is also known as Silvermine Bay. There used to be silver mines here along the Silver River which flows through Mui Wo. I didn't do full justice to Mui Wo. I just looked at one of its temples and took a walk along its lovely beach - sort of - and past its famous hotel. I say sort of took a walk on its beach, as beaches in Hong Kong are currently closed due to covid. I walked on the walkway near the beach. At one point I ventured onto the beach, but they play very loud government announcements intermittently warning people to leave the beach or face a HK$5000 fine, about £500, quite an expensive visit to the beach. Needless to say, I left.

Mui Wo has a very nice hotel on its beach - the Silvermine Beach Resort. It also has a market, lots of restaurants, temples, a waterfall, a cave and some excellent hikes.

Temple, Mui Wo.

Temple, Mui Wo.

Temple, Mui Wo.

Temple, Mui Wo.

Silvermine Beach Resort.

Silvermine Beach Resort.

Silvermine Beach Resort

Silvermine Beach Resort

Silvermine Beach Resort.

Silvermine Beach Resort.

Beach.

Beach.

Beach.

Beach.

Beach.

Beach.

Beach.

Beach.

Beach.

Beach.

Beach.

Beach.

River.

River.

River and mangroves.

River and mangroves.

River and mangroves.

River and mangroves.

River.

River.

There are other beautiful parts of Lantau that I may or may not visit later. Cheung Sha and Pui O have beautiful beaches, but they will also be closed at the moment. Then, of course, there's the famous Po Lin Monastery and Big Buddha statue, however, I've read that the Big Buddha is covered up for restoration work at the moment and has been since June.

Posted by irenevt 02:34 Archived in Hong Kong

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Comments

Hello, Irene! Thanks for your great virtual tour of Tai O, a very off-the-beaten place in Hong Kong. Take care!

by Vic_IV

Hi Victor, Happy New Year to you and your family.

by irenevt

Hi Irene, i love your eye for detail in out of the way places. Wonderful pictures. Happy New Year to You and Yours. Stay Safe Alec.

by alectrevor

Happy New Year to you, too, Alec. Let's hope 2021 (and 2031) are happier years.

by irenevt

I wish you a good and peaceful new year!

Hugs from Italy!

by Maurizioagos

Interesting outing as usual :)

Happy New Year!

by hennaonthetrek

Happy New Year, Maurizio.

by irenevt

Happy New Year, Henna.

by irenevt

What a fun place to take pictures. Loved the cats!

Happy New Year! It is probably the new year already in Hong Kong. We have about 10 hours to go here.

by Beausoleil

Happy New Year, Sally, to you and your family. Been 2021 for almost 10 hours here now. Glad you like the cats. I seem to encounter them everywhere I go.

by irenevt

Another great outing! The street art looks excellent, I always enjoy seeing markets, and who doesn't love a cat photo or several?! I find it odd that you can go to quite crowded places in the city but not walk on an empty beach.

by ToonSarah

Quite a lot of the covid rules don't really make sense. The beaches rule has annoyed many of us. It's actually quite cold for here. People wouldn't be flocking there to sunbathe. They just want to be able to go for a walk.

by irenevt

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