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A retirement home for deities.

Exploring Waterfall Bay, Wah Fu.

rain

Today is Easter Sunday, I didn't want to do a long hike, as it is starting to get hot and humid here, so I decided to head to Waterfall Bay in Wah Fu. This is a place I have read a lot about recently and have been meaning to visit for some time. Its appeal is twofold: waterfalls and statues. Wah Fu itself was built as a public housing estate in 1967 and renovated in 2003.

To get to Wah Fu I took the MTR to Hong Kong University Station exit A2, then took the 40M bus to Wah Fu Commercial Complex. From there, I walked down Wah Fu Road onto Waterfall Bay Road and into Waterfall Bay Park.

Flowers in Central as I made my way to Wah Fu.

Flowers in Central as I made my way to Wah Fu.

Flowers in Wah Fu.

Flowers in Wah Fu.

Flowers in Wah Fu.

Flowers in Wah Fu.

Wah Fu.

Wah Fu.

The odd thing about visiting here is that much of what I went to see is considered too dangerous for the general public to access, so to get to it, I had to climb fences, bypass spikes and walk rather unstable bridges!!! Apparently this is because there have been several drownings in this area and the government has closed it off.

Some of the fences you need to climb.

Some of the fences you need to climb.

Fences and Spikes.

Fences and Spikes.

More fences to climb.

More fences to climb.

While wandering around this area, I came across several lovely viewpoints, even on a dull day. I also saw a rather chubby squirrel, almost not worth mentioning back home, but they are unusual here.

Boat on Lamma <br />Channel.

Boat on Lamma
Channel.

View towards Lamma.

View towards Lamma.

Hungry Squirrel.

Hungry Squirrel.

Waterfall Bay is called after a huge waterfall that used to be used by sailors to replenish their fresh water supplies when they were on long sea voyages to places such as: China, Macau, Malacca or Galle. The waterfall used to be much bigger than it is now. There is a watercolour painting of it by William Havell dating from 1816 and showing it as around three times its current size. When Pok Fu Lam Reservoir was built in 1863, many mountain streams that fed into this waterfall were dammed, thus greatly reducing the water supply to the waterfall.

There are lots of ghost stories associated with Waterfall Bay. Apparently a group of pirates came here for fresh water at some point during the Quing Dynasty then massacred villagers in a settlement nearby. There are also stories about a lady in a long white dress who has been seen here. She's normally seen from the back. She has long flowing hair. If you approach her and she turns and looks at you, you will see she has no face. She is a water spirit and will pull you under the water and drown you. Fortunately, I m not superstitious, so I wasn't put off by these legends. I rather think Hong Kong people just like being scared.

Waterfall at Waterfall Bay, Wah Fu, Hong Kong.

Waterfall at Waterfall Bay, Wah Fu, Hong Kong.

At the Waterfall.

At the Waterfall.

At the Waterfall.

At the Waterfall.

At the Waterfall.

At the Waterfall.

At the Waterfall.

At the Waterfall.

I don't normally do selfies but today I did.

I don't normally do selfies but today I did.

Flowers next to the falls.

Flowers next to the falls.

Waterfall Bay overlooks Lamma Island and the Lamma Channel. As this is a fairly strategic position, it was used as a defensive position by the British during World War II. There are remains of a pillbox here and at one time there was also a searchlight called the Lyon Light. The pillbox was used as a bunker by Allied soldiers during the Battle of Hong Kong in 1941.

War Remains.

War Remains.

War Remains.

War Remains.

War Remains.

War Remains.

Camping by the waterfall.

Camping by the waterfall.

Camping.

Camping.

Impressive Tree.

Impressive Tree.

Shoreline.

Shoreline.

The other special thing about this area is the deities' retirement home. Chinese people are very superstitious. They would never desecrate one of their statues of their gods, but statues break, statue owners die. What do you do with all those leftover statues? It would be bad luck to throw them away. The answer is - you bring them here to Waterfall Bay. First, there were just a few statues, then around thirty years ago a resident of the nearby Wah Fu Estate decided to look after them. He even cemented them to a cliff so they would not get broken in bad weather. People heard about this and took their unwanted statues here. The same resident looked after them. He accepts statues from any religion: Taoist, Buddhist, Hindu, Christian. All of them live in harmony here. Apparently this resident still visits the statues twice a day.

I wonder if I met one of his helpers today as a Chinese man got into photos and posed with the statues and invited me to look around. I know he isn't the resident who started taking in statues of the deities because I found an article about him with pictures of him. He is much older. I couldn't really communicate well with this man, but he was very friendly and welcoming.

While the waterfall side of Waterfall Bay Park has all the ghostly legends, apparently the statue side has perfect Feng Shui and abounds in positive energy. Personally, I really liked both sides of the park.

I think this is one of the people who looks after the deities.

I think this is one of the people who looks after the deities.

Monkey god.

Monkey god.

Assortment of deities.

Assortment of deities.

Assortment of deities.

Assortment of deities.

Assortment of deities.

Assortment of deities.

Assortment of deities.

Assortment of deities.

Assortment of deities.

Assortment of deities.

Assortment of deities.

Assortment of deities.

Lucky Tree.

Lucky Tree.

Assortment of deities.

Assortment of deities.

Assortment of deities.

Assortment of deities.

Assortment of deities.

Assortment of deities.

Assortment of deities.

Assortment of deities.

Assortment of deities.

Assortment of deities.

Assortment of deities.

Assortment of deities.

Assortment of deities.

Assortment of deities.

Assortment of deities.

Assortment of deities.

Assortment of deities.

Assortment of deities.

Assortment of deities.

Assortment of deities.

Assortment of deities.

Assortment of deities.

Assortment of deities.

Assortment of deities.

Near the statues there is an area where brave locals go swimming in the sea. I say brave, not because there is anything wrong with swimming in the sea here, but because in this area whenever a boat passes, which is frequently, the sea gets very, very rough and you risk being thrown against rocks. I love swimming and am delighted that since April 1st beaches and swimming pools have reopened here, but I still wouldn't jump in in this area. I have however been really enjoying our pool back home.

Area where people go swimming.

Area where people go swimming.

Swimmers.

Swimmers.

When I had finished viewing the waterfall and the deities' retirement home. I climbed to the top of the waterfall. This involved jumping another fence. I stood on rocks next to the starting point of the waterfall until I started to succumb to vertigo and decided this maybe wasn't a good idea. I also took a look at the beautiful stream feeding into the waterfall.

View from above.

View from above.

Stream.

Stream.

Stream.

Stream.

Bridge.

Bridge.

At the top of the falls.

At the top of the falls.

View from the top of the falls.

View from the top of the falls.

View from the top of the falls.

View from the top of the falls.

Taking this photo from the top of the falls made me dizzy.

Taking this photo from the top of the falls made me dizzy.

Then I crossed a tiny bridge, headed towards another fence that needed to be climbed and set off in the direction of Cyberport Waterfront Park. This is a pleasant park where even on a dull day lots of people had gathered to pitch their tent and have a picnic, fly their kite, go fishing, ride their bicycle or walk their dog. Walking your dog here however may not be a good idea. For many years Hong Kong has had a dog poisoner who has never been caught. He used to operate on Bowen Road. Now he's moved to Cyberport. Of course, it may or may not be the same person, but there were warning signs everywhere about dog poisonings and posters telling people to love and cherish animals. Many people were still walking their dogs here though most were under tight control on a leash. There were also some rather amusing, I thought, guidelines on what to do when you encounter a wild boar.

Pleasant views on walk to park.

Pleasant views on walk to park.

Pleasant views on walk to park.

Pleasant views on walk to park.

Pleasant views on walk to park.

Pleasant views on walk to park.

Pleasant views on walk to park.

Pleasant views on walk to park.

Pleasant views on walk to park.

Pleasant views on walk to park.

Pleasant views on walk to park.

Pleasant views on walk to park.

Pleasant views on walk to park.

Pleasant views on walk to park.

Entrance to the park.

Entrance to the park.

View along the park.

View along the park.

Poster about the dog poisoner.

Poster about the dog poisoner.

Still walking their dogs but keeping them on a leash.

Still walking their dogs but keeping them on a leash.

Be Kind to Animals Poster.

Be Kind to Animals Poster.

The dos and don'ts of encountering wild boars.

The dos and don'ts of encountering wild boars.

Flying Kites in the Park.

Flying Kites in the Park.

Camping in the park.

Camping in the park.

View of Pok Fu Lam.

View of Pok Fu Lam.

Cyberport.

Cyberport.

Cyberport Mall.

Cyberport Mall.

After the park I walked towards Cyberport Mall then took a minibus to Kennedy Town where I took the MTR back home.

Posted by irenevt 13:50 Archived in Hong Kong

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Comments

Lovely waterfall after athletic afternoon! :)

by hennaonthetrek

Short walk, filled with obstacles. Certainly was athletic. Haha.

by irenevt

I'm happy to see there is someplace on earth where all the deities get along nicely. Perhaps we could learn a lesson here.

Beautiful waterfall and cute squirrel.

by Beausoleil

Hi Sally, yes I agree nice to see all religions accepted somewhere. Hope all good with you.

by irenevt

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