A Travellerspoint blog

Sometimes you might as well just stay in bed ......

Problems anyone???

storm

So ... on Monday I went to Nam Sang Wai. I did not intend to go exploring again until Thursday. On Tuesday, we had our best swim of the summer, although the typhoon three and the amber rain signals were raised. As we swam, we were pelted with rain, but the rain had cooled the water of the swimming pool and had made most people flee, so it was uncrowded and refreshing. Just bliss!

We had intended to eat out, but on route to the restaurants, we got so drenched we felt they might not even let us in. We just went home. I cooked. It was fine.

Wednesday, we were meeting a friend for dinner. We said we'd swim first, but thunder and lightning put paid to that. On the way home from dinner, one hell of a storm broke out. I'd say we largely just missed being out in it, but we could certainly hear it when we got in.

I had several plans for Thursday. I thought I'll decide which one to do in the morning. However, when my alarm went off, rain was pelting down, thunder was rumbling, lightning was flashing. I switched off the alarm and went back to sleep. What else can you do?

When I finally woke up, the weather had cleared up a bit, but it wasn't early any more. I also had to be home at a certain time for a prearranged phone call. What to do? Should I just stay in? I decided against this; sometimes I just go stir crazy; I needed out. I thought I'll do a short trip out and back before the phone call - Tsing Yi Park, that would be perfect. And it would have been, but being me, I had to stick in a couple more things to do in there.

I decided since I would be on the Tung Chung Line, it was about time I took a look at Kowloon High-speed Rail Station. This building is an example of very modern architecture and there is a garden on the roof with views across the harbour. However, "Duh!!!" When I got there, the station was closed as the border crossing there with China is closed. I was angry with myself. I should have known this. As getting from the Tung Chung Line to the Kowloon High Speed Rail Station involves going through Elements Shopping Centre, I had a quick look there. I don't really like shopping centres. This one was typical Hong Kong designer goods stores. The ice-skating rink was the best bit.

Elements Shopping Mall.

Elements Shopping Mall.

Elements Shopping Mall.

Elements Shopping Mall.

Ice-skating Rink.

Ice-skating Rink.

Ice-skating Rink.

Ice-skating Rink.

Ice-skating Rink.

Ice-skating Rink.

So Kowloon Station hadn't really worked out, but not to worry, I had read a description of a great viewing point over one of the largest container terminals in the world, just a short walk from Lai King Station, also on the Tung Chung Line. OK, container terminals aren't pretty, but the photo accompanying the article was lovely.

The directions for the viewing point which, believe me should have been pretty simple, were very confused. I accidentally walked past the viewing point that was being described. This did, however, have the advantage of me finding a lovely stream a bit further on in the middle of a built up area. When I finally found the recommended viewing area, it was now a construction site. I could see where it was possible to take a good photo from, but I could not access it.

Stream.

Stream.

View across the container terminals.

View across the container terminals.

View across the container terminals.

View across the container terminals.

Well that was now two out of three failures. I only had Tsing Yi Park and a shopping trip to Marks and Spencers in Maritime Square left to do. I headed towards Tsing Yi Park by taking exit B from Tsing Yi Station.

It amazes me that I have never before been to this park. After all, I go to Tsing Yi to shop quite often. Tsing Yi Park is a European style park which occupies an area of around seven hectares. It was opened to the public in 1996.

This park has beautiful ponds with elegant statues next to them. It also has a restaurant, tennis courts, soccer fields and a lookout tower. Despite being in the heart of Tsing Yi, it is peaceful here.

Map of Tsing Yi Park.

Map of Tsing Yi Park.

Trees near the entrance to Tsing Yi Park.

Trees near the entrance to Tsing Yi Park.

The first area I went to was a large pond with several statues. Some of these are of people; others are of fish or birds. Behind the pond there is a European style folly. It's actually a shelter with seating inside and seating on its roof, but it's designed to look like the kind of folly you might find on an English country estate.

Looking across the pond towards the folly.

Looking across the pond towards the folly.

Close up of the folly.

Close up of the folly.

View across the lily filled pond.

View across the lily filled pond.

Boy and Fish Statue.

Boy and Fish Statue.

Lovers' Statue near the pond.

Lovers' Statue near the pond.

Bird Statue.

Bird Statue.

Bird Statue.

Bird Statue.

Waterfall feeding into the pond.

Waterfall feeding into the pond.

Building at the end of the pond.

Building at the end of the pond.

Building at the end of the pond.

Building at the end of the pond.

The building at the end of the pond includes a restaurant. It has another of those full moon shaped doorways that symbolize happiness.

Full Moon Doorways.

Full Moon Doorways.

Full Moon Doorways.

Full Moon Doorways.

I wandered round further past beautiful banyan trees with their long roots, colourful flowers and a lovely stream crossed by a little bridge. The stream was home to many turtles and golden koi fish.

More banyan trees.

More banyan trees.

Flowers and trees.

Flowers and trees.

Stream.

Stream.

Flowers.

Flowers.

Flowers.

Flowers.

Flowers.

Flowers.

Stream.

Stream.

I was nearing the end of my explorations when I got a call from my irritated husband. He was having to deal with an airline I phoned yesterday who said they'd call me back yesterday, plus I had to be in for a bank phone call. I only had the lookout left to do and stuff to buy from Marks and Spencers. The sky was already dark. As I climbed to the lookout it went pitch black and the familiar rumble of thunder started. The lookout view wasn't really all that impressive anyway.

Looking up at the lookout tower.

Looking up at the lookout tower.

The Lookout Tower.

The Lookout Tower.

At the lookout tower.

At the lookout tower.

Rainy view from the lookout tower.

Rainy view from the lookout tower.

Rainy view from the lookout tower.

Rainy view from the lookout tower.

As I was coming down from the lookout tower the rain started and the thunder and lightning intensified. I was relieved to make it to Maritime Square Shopping Centre and hurried to Marks and Spencers. I wanted a chicken to roast, but in keeping with the rest of the day they didn't have any. I also needed sliced bread but forgot to buy it. I did make it in time for my phone call, but still think not having bothered to get out of bed at all may have improved my day.

Posted by irenevt 14:51 Archived in Hong Kong

Email this entryFacebookStumbleUpon

Table of contents

Comments

Well, at least you got some fresh air out of your outing (pun intended :D)

It keeps amazing me how nature-ish the parks are in Hong Kong!

by hennaonthetrek

Hi Henna, glad I did go out as there was a red rain storm, thunder and flooding later. Got to go out when you can. There are lots of tall buildings round the parks, but the parks themselves are lovely. Thanks for viewing. Irene

by irenevt

Amazing how they have contained the water lilies in a rectangle within the lily pond. Wonder how they keep them from escaping?

Lovely park.

by Beausoleil

Hi Sally, they seem to have a barrier around the lilies, not sure why they want them just in one place.
There's probably some kind of logic behind it. Thank you for visiting.

by irenevt

Comments on this blog entry are now closed to non-Travellerspoint members. You can still leave a comment if you are a member of Travellerspoint.

Login