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Meanwhile back in the village

A Trip to Tak Wah Park

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The Old Houses in Tak Wah Park, Tsuen Wan, Hong Kong.

The Old Houses in Tak Wah Park, Tsuen Wan, Hong Kong.

Today l wanted to go shopping for a few things that I can't get in Discovery Bay, so I decided to go to Tsuen Wan. My main logic for going there was that I also wanted to visit Tak Wah Park, which has been on my long to do list for quite some time.

The area where this park is located used to be a Hakka village called Hoi Pa Village. This village dated from the late eighteenth century and was home to several different Hakka clans. When the British were building Tsuen Wan New Town, they removed several indigenous villages and relocated them in the nearby hills. Somehow this village managed to escape being completely destroyed; parts of it were kept and the area around it was turned into a park. The original parts of the village which remain include the Chan Yi Cheung Ancestral Hall and a row of Old Houses dating from 1904.

Main Entrance Gate.

Main Entrance Gate.

Jockey Club Tak Wah Park.

Jockey Club Tak Wah Park.

This was the Entrance Gateway I used.

This was the Entrance Gateway I used.

One of the historic buildings here is the Chan Yi Cheung Ancestral Hall, which was built in the late nineteenth century. It is made from a mixture of timber and grey and black bricks. Its tiled roof has beautiful plant motifs under it. This building is classed as a Grade 3 Historic Building. It is not possible to go inside.

Ancestral Hall.

Ancestral Hall.

Ancestral Hall.

Ancestral Hall.

Pond and viewing platform.

Pond and viewing platform.

The Old Houses were built in 1904. The houses are made of rammed earth, timber and grey and black bricks. They are a typical example of the prevalent style of architecture found in South China at the end of the nineteenth century. The Old Houses became a Declared Monument in 1986. Again it's not possible to go inside.

Old Houses.

Old Houses.

Old Houses.

Old Houses.

Old Houses.

Old Houses.

Old Houses.

Old Houses.

The park is surrounded by old village walls, which would have originally been built for protection. In the grounds there are ponds, waterfalls, a camelia garden, rock sculptures and lots of beautiful old trees. There are plenty of shady places to sit.

Village Walls.

Village Walls.

Waterfall.

Waterfall.

Waterfall.

Waterfall.

Magnificent Trees.

Magnificent Trees.

Stone lantern and trees.

Stone lantern and trees.

Building in the park.

Building in the park.

Building in the park.

Building in the park.

Building in the park.

Building in the park.

Building in the park.

Building in the park.

Buildings on the pond.

Buildings on the pond.

Pond.

Pond.

Relaxing in the park.

Relaxing in the park.

Old Building. The front of this had been covered in scaffolding which was in the process of being removed so I couldn't go close and am not sure what it is.

Old Building. The front of this had been covered in scaffolding which was in the process of being removed so I couldn't go close and am not sure what it is.

Actually just found out this is the old house that was home to Yau Yuen-cheung, a scholar, who lived from 1865 to 1937 and is now Tsuen Wan Environmental Resource Centre. When bamboo scaffolding is removed here, it's hurled towards the ground and everyone has to get out of the way so I could not go too near unfortunately.

Little Bridge.

Little Bridge.

The park has many doorways to pass through and each seems to be a different shape. Traditionally most Chinese doorways were round to look like the full moon.

Different Shaped Doorways. This one reminds me of a thistle.

Different Shaped Doorways. This one reminds me of a thistle.

Doorway.

Doorway.

Looking from one doorway to another.

Looking from one doorway to another.

Clover shaped doorway.

Clover shaped doorway.

The ponds in this park were filled with turtles and brightly coloured fish. In Chinese culture, turtles are one of the four auspicious beasts together with the phoenix, the tiger, and the dragon. Turtles symbolise knowledge, perseverance, prosperity, and long life.

Turtles and Reflections.

Turtles and Reflections.

Turtles.

Turtles.

Turtles.

Turtles.

The area around this beautiful peaceful park is crowded, built-up and modern. I found two beautiful cats making themselves at home in one of the shops I visited.

Modern glass towers loom over the park.

Modern glass towers loom over the park.

I liked the murals on the tower building.

I liked the murals on the tower building.

I liked the murals on the tower building.

I liked the murals on the tower building.

Cats can do anything they like.

Cats can do anything they like.

Cats can do anything they like.

Cats can do anything they like.

Back in DB I went out for dinner with Peter and a friend. I took some pictures of the Christmas trees by night.

Christmas tree at night.

Christmas tree at night.

Christmas tree at night.

Christmas tree at night.

Posted by irenevt 08:56 Archived in Hong Kong

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Comments

Nice outing! Did you find the items you were looking for? :)

by hennaonthetrek

Happy New Year, Henna. I found most of them but I wanted also some cheap nonprescription reading glasses for Peter in different strengths. I could not find those.

by irenevt

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