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On The Waterfront.

Tsuen Wan West.

semi-overcast

On the waterfront..

On the waterfront..

When I went to the beaches near the Ting Kau Bridge last week, my bus passed lots of little animal models scattered along a waterfront promenade. I hadn't realised the walkway along the front stretched so far and was curious to find out what these models were, so on Tuesday, I set off to take a look.

I discovered that for some reason I had only ever walked along the waterfront on the left hand side of Tsuen Wan West Station. I actually think the walkway on the right, where the animal models are located, may not have even been built on my first visit, as it only dates from September 2021.

I exited the station through exit B1, making sure to buy a very large bottle of water before I went anywhere, then I headed off to the right. There had just been a downpour and fortunately the rain, plus a bit of a breeze, brought some merciful relief from the non-stop heat.

Tsuen Wan West Station.

Tsuen Wan West Station.

I don't know why, but I started the day with low expectations, and then ended up really enjoying it. The light over the Ramblers Channel that separates Tsing Yi from Tseun Wan West was beautiful. The channel was filled with a wide assortment of large ships and smaller boats. It was a busy scene with lots to look at.

Ferry plying the Rambler Channel between Tsuen Wan and Tsing Yi.

Ferry plying the Rambler Channel between Tsuen Wan and Tsing Yi.

Boats on the Ramblers Channel.

Boats on the Ramblers Channel.

Ships.

Ships.

Ships.

Ships.

Along the walkway the white fence had been decorated with blue waves. I saw people who wanted to fish using the blue parts as footholds in order to climb the fence and set themselves up with their fishing rods on the rocks below. Since it is not long since Mid-Autumn Festival, there were also lanterns decorating the fence, too.

Wave fence.

Wave fence.

Lanterns line the waterfront.

Lanterns line the waterfront.

View with Din Dong, lanterns and ships.

View with Din Dong, lanterns and ships.

View over the channel.

View over the channel.

The waterfront.

The waterfront.

As always in Hong Kong there were splashes of colour from several different kinds of flowering trees and plants along the way.

Flowering tree.

Flowering tree.

Crepe myrtle.

Crepe myrtle.

Crepe myrtle.

Crepe myrtle.

Beautiful yellow flowers.

Beautiful yellow flowers.

Near the water, in some places, there were beautiful wild grasses growing. Most of this was the usual white colour, but some was purple, which I don't think I have seen before. And to think people climb mountains to see this grass!

Grasses.

Grasses.

Grasses.

Grasses.

Through the grass.

Through the grass.

Through the grass.

Through the grass.

The water through grass.

The water through grass.

The Water through grass.

The Water through grass.

There were also several elegant looking egrets flying around or perched on rocks. One was willing to pose for me. There were also large numbers of sparrows and pigeons.

Egret.

Egret.

Someone was gathering shellfish. There were lots of people fishing, jogging or doing exercises.

Collecting shellfish.

Collecting shellfish.

Fisherman.

Fisherman.

Fisherman.

Fisherman.

The models I had come to see turned out to be part of “Water Carnival by the Harbour”. Like the artworks I saw when I walked along the front from Central to Wan Chai, these are part of a festival aimed at getting people out and enjoying the waterfront. The ones here were based on Din Dong and his friend Jentle Cat. I had vaguely heard of them, as I think some of the children I used to teach had pencil cases or notebooks with Din Dong motifs on.

Din Dong is a cartoon cat, created by Hong Kong comic authors John Chan and Pam Hung. He has many adventures together with his friend, Jentle Cat. Din Dong is based on an actual pet cat owned by one of the authors. Din Dong is noted for always being positive and his motto is "Impossible is Possible". Apparently this character is very popular in several Asian countries. Personally, I found the models quite cute and I liked that a lot of thought had gone into the different ways they were depicted. Plus there were Din Dong themed things here for little kids to do, such as : slides, roundabouts, buses to sit in, windmills to explore. I reckon kids would love it. If you think some of the models are looking a bit the worse for wear, this is because the display has been here all summer through excessive heat, torrential rain and a couple of typhoons.

Din Dong's Happy Village.

Din Dong's Happy Village.

Din Dong and Jentle Cat.

Din Dong and Jentle Cat.

Welcome to the world of Din Dong.

Welcome to the world of Din Dong.

Cat Bus.

Cat Bus.

Cat Bus.

Cat Bus.

Looks like Din Dong has been working out down the gym.

Looks like Din Dong has been working out down the gym.

Din Dong Beach.

Din Dong Beach.

Din Dong Beach.

Din Dong Beach.

Din Dong Sailor.

Din Dong Sailor.

Din Dong Windmill.

Din Dong Windmill.

Din Dong Campsite and Mermaid Slide.

Din Dong Campsite and Mermaid Slide.

Mermaid Slide and Tent.

Mermaid Slide and Tent.

Din Dong boats and snorkeling.

Din Dong boats and snorkeling.

Din Dong character.

Din Dong character.

Din Dong.

Din Dong.

Din Dong Tree.

Din Dong Tree.

Din Dong photographer.

Din Dong photographer.

Din Dong Bench.

Din Dong Bench.

Jentle Cat.

Jentle Cat.

Jentle Cat.

Jentle Cat.

Asleep in a coffee cup.

Asleep in a coffee cup.

Din Dong Farm.

Din Dong Farm.

Din Dong mermaid.

Din Dong mermaid.

Din Dong fisherman.

Din Dong fisherman.

Din Dong Fishing.

Din Dong Fishing.

Din Dong is apparently all about optimism and kindness, so there were several inspirational slogans scattered around, too.

I am here with you.

I am here with you.

You are amazing.

You are amazing.

When it rains, look for rainbows. When it's dark, look for stars.

When it rains, look for rainbows. When it's dark, look for stars.

Of course, there was also another twenty-five years since the handover sculpture. These are ubiquitous. I left the promenade, went through a sort of orange tunnel, passed a little pier and took another look at the Ting Kau Bridge, not that I am obsessed or anything, honest. I didn't walk all the way to the bridge, but knew I wasn't far from where I got too hot and leapt on a bus last week. I noticed markers at 500m intervals along this walk, encouraging people to walk all the way to Sham Tseng, a village famous for its goose restaurants. Maybe I'll do that when it is cooler. I've been there just once before in a large group. We went to a goose restaurant. Someone ordered scallops and I tried one. I had a severe allergic reaction that ended up with me having to take ten days off work. The goose was good though, just in case you are wondering.

Twenty-five years since the handover.

Twenty-five years since the handover.

Channel view

Channel view

Pier on the Ramblers Channel.

Pier on the Ramblers Channel.

Pier.

Pier.

Ting Kau Bridge.

Ting Kau Bridge.

Ting Kau Bridge.

Ting Kau Bridge.

Tunnel.

Tunnel.

Slope down to the walkway as I made my way back

Slope down to the walkway as I made my way back

I walked all the way back to Tsuen Wan West MTR Station and decided to take another quick look at the park and waterfront area on that side. I have visited both of these before. I was really, really surprised to hear roaring and discover that the robotic T-rex I went to see in Harbour City is now on display in Tsuen Wan. What a great idea to let others enjoy it, rather than just display it for such a short time.

I wonder what made these ?

I wonder what made these ?

What's that over there?.

What's that over there?.

Oh no, it's him again.

Oh no, it's him again.

He's coming nearer.

He's coming nearer.

Arrrrgggg!!!!

Arrrrgggg!!!!

After my lucky escape from the T-rex, I needed a calming walk in the park, strolling across bridges, looking at waterfalls, turtles and frogs. Throw in some soothing works of art and I was all calmed down before boarding the train home.

Bridge.

Bridge.

Waterfall.

Waterfall.

Fish statues and turtles.

Fish statues and turtles.

Sleeping frog statue. Do you think if I kissed him, he would turn into a prince?

Sleeping frog statue. Do you think if I kissed him, he would turn into a prince?

Peacock Stairs. Just checking that they are still there.

Peacock Stairs. Just checking that they are still there.

Viewed from a certain side this picture looks 3-d.

Viewed from a certain side this picture looks 3-d.

Viewed from a certain side this picture looks 3-d.

Viewed from a certain side this picture looks 3-d.

Back home Peter and I went out for a very enjoyable swim. It had been a very pleasant day.

Posted by irenevt 07:15 Archived in Hong Kong

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Comments

Thanks for your virtual tour, Irene1 You allowed us to follow your steps... Yes, we all have to be careful, if we have some known allergies, especially with food...

by Vic_IV

Hi Victor, the problem for me was I had never eaten scallops before that and guess what? I won't be eating them ever again. Haha.

by irenevt

I don't think you should kiss the frog. If he turned into a Prince, Peter would be upset.

I loved the cat bus. I want one!

by Beausoleil

Hi Sally, I'm sure that cat bus would look perfect in your garden. There was a minibus, too.

by irenevt

Glad you had such a good day! The cat sculptures are fun (I liked the one asleep in the coffee cup!) and the harbour views lovely. The egret is beautiful too but I think my favourite sight on this walk came right at the end, those peacock stairs!

by ToonSarah

In Tsuen Wan I have come across a lot of lovely painted stairways. They transform a boring concrete area into something beautiful and fun.

by irenevt

I love that the T-Rex has made it to a new home. The Din Dong park is amazing - must have cost a bundle to install. Thanks love your blogs

by Catherine

Hi Catherine, yes it's good to see the T-rex is still around. The Din Dong Park was pretty cute. Thanks for visiting. Hope all good with you.

by irenevt

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