A Travellerspoint blog

January 2021

Stairway to Heaven .......

Well, Conduit Road, anyway.

semi-overcast

Hong Kong's Escalators.

Hong Kong's Escalators.

Walkway.

Walkway.

Hong Kong has the world's longest outdoor covered escalator system. It goes from Central to Mid-Levels, an uphill distance of over 800-metres. This system was originally opened in October 1993 and cost around HK$245 million to build. It is made up of twenty escalators and three moving walkways and it takes about twenty to twenty-five minutes to travel its entire length. The escalators travel downwards from Mid-Levels from 6am to 10am daily, so that commuters from the residential areas in Mid-Levels can reach their offices in Central. After 10am, the flow is reversed so that the escalators travel uphill until midnight to enable people to get back home.

The first section of escalators starts from outside Central Market and runs from Cochrane Street uphill to Wellington Street. The first area I got off to look at is a cluster of adjoining historical buildings, which now contain shops, restaurants, cultural venues and sites of historical interest. Together these buildings are known as Tai Kwun. One of these is the former Central Police Station Compound which dates back to the mid-nineteenth century. It was declared a national monument in 1995. Other historical buildings here are the Central Magistracy, one of the oldest surviving law court buildings in Hong Kong and the Victoria Prison Compound, which includes some of the earliest colonial buildings in Hong Kong, dating back to the mid nineteenth century. Nearby streets have names like Old Bailey Street and Chancery Lane.

Tai Kwun.

Tai Kwun.

Tai Kwun.

Tai Kwun.

Tai Kwun.

Tai Kwun.

Tai Kwun.

Tai Kwun.

Tai Kwun.

Tai Kwun.

Tai Kwun.

Tai Kwun.

Tai Kwun.

Tai Kwun.

Tai Kwun.

Tai Kwun.

The Magistracy.

The Magistracy.

The entrance to the Magistracy.

The entrance to the Magistracy.

Victoria Prison.

Victoria Prison.

Victoria Prison.

Victoria Prison.

Victoria Prison.

Victoria Prison.

Victoria Prison.

Victoria Prison.

After looking around Tai Kwun, I went the other direction on Hollywood Road. Apparently Hollywood Road is named after Hollywood House in Bristol, England. This was the country estate of Sir John Francis Davis, the second governor of Hong Kong, though judging by the street art here some people took it more literally.

Street Art on Hollywood Road, Madera Hollywood Hotel.

Street Art on Hollywood Road, Madera Hollywood Hotel.

Street Art on Hollywood Road, Madera Hollywood Hotel.

Street Art on Hollywood Road, Madera Hollywood Hotel.

Hollywood Road is famous for its antique shops. These sell porcelain, sculptures, statues, Chinese furniture and rugs. I took a few photos, but was shooed away by one shop owner, maybe he thought I was casing the joint.

Antiques on Hollywood Road.

Antiques on Hollywood Road.

Antiques on Hollywood Road.

Antiques on Hollywood Road.

Antiques on Hollywood Road.

Antiques on Hollywood Road.

Antiques on Hollywood Road.

Antiques on Hollywood Road.

At one time Hollywood Road was also famous for the manufacture of coffins, but the opening of the escalator system brought about an influx of visitors and eventually the gentrification of the area. When I was researching for this blog, I even found an article entitled 'From Coffins to Coffee' in reference to the multitude of cafes and bars that have sprung up here, in place of the coffin makers. There used to be many coffin shops on Hollywood Road , now there are just five. The name of such shops translated literally from Cantonese is apparently ' longevity shops', a kind of Chinese euphemism.

A Longevity Shop.

A Longevity Shop.

One of the best things to see on Hollywood road is the Man Mo Temple. This colourful temple was built in 1847. "Man" means civil and “Mo” means martial. The Man Mo Temple is dedicated to two Daoist deities: Man Chung - god of literature, and Kwan Kung - god of martial arts. I like this temple with its deer statues and huge coils of incense. Outside the temple there was an old rickshaw and lots of spring blossom, probably in preparation for Chinese New Year.

Rickshaw and Spring Blossom.

Rickshaw and Spring Blossom.

In Man Mo Temple.

In Man Mo Temple.

In Man Mo Temple.

In Man Mo Temple.

Deer Statue.

Deer Statue.

Burning Incense.

Burning Incense.

Altar.

Altar.

Incense Coils.

Incense Coils.

Altar.

Altar.

Incense Coils.

Incense Coils.

The next stretch of escalator from Hollywood Road upwards was under renovation, so instead of returning there from the Man Mo Temple, I looked at the street art on Tank Lane. Then climbed up the steep steps of Ladder Street towards the Museum of Medical Sciences. There were more examples of street art on route.

Anhao Wellness, yoga, Pilates and fitness centre on Ladder Street.

Anhao Wellness, yoga, Pilates and fitness centre on Ladder Street.

Street Art on Ladder Street. Brazilian artist, Alex Senna, depicts a drunk or homeless figure with a dog stretched out on the low wall.

Street Art on Ladder Street. Brazilian artist, Alex Senna, depicts a drunk or homeless figure with a dog stretched out on the low wall.

Street Art on Tank Lane, South Korean XEVA‘s Bruce Lee work has lasted since HKwalls2015.

Street Art on Tank Lane, South Korean XEVA‘s Bruce Lee work has lasted since HKwalls2015.

Street Art on Tank Lane.

Street Art on Tank Lane.

Street Art on Tank Lane.

Street Art on Tank Lane.

Street Art Outside a Cafe on Ladder Street.

Street Art Outside a Cafe on Ladder Street.

On the way I passed the YMCA on Bridges Street. This was built in 1918 in Chicago School Style. The premises included the first indoor swimming pool in Hong Kong. It also had a sports playground with a jogging track.

The Bridges Street Centre.

The Bridges Street Centre.

Hong Kong Museum of Medical Sciences was built in response to an outbreak of plague in the nearby Tai Ping Shan area in 1894. The building was completed in 1906. It acted as a Bacteriological Institute. Originally there were three buildings. Nowadays only two remain. These buildings were declared a monument in 1990, then became a museum In 1995. At the moment due to Covid all museums in Hong Kong are closed, but I've been here before. I remember it having a particularly gruesome exhibition on foot binding. There was a church that I liked the look of near the museum. I found out later it was the The Church of Christ in China, also known as Hop Yat Church.

Hong Kong Museum of Medical Science.

Hong Kong Museum of Medical Science.

The Church of Christ in China Hop Yat Church.

The Church of Christ in China Hop Yat Church.

I passed other beautiful examples of street art, but of course, am not sure where I saw them. I also noticed the many steep lanes in this area and the trees that seemed to grow directly out of the walls.

Street Art on Square Street.

Street Art on Square Street.

Street Art.  Portrait by HK illustrator Neil Wang for HKwalls2018, a street art festival.

Street Art. Portrait by HK illustrator Neil Wang for HKwalls2018, a street art festival.

Street Art.

Street Art.

Brazilian,Alex Senna, joined the HKWalls 2018 team.

Brazilian,Alex Senna, joined the HKWalls 2018 team.

Steep Lanes.

Steep Lanes.

Steep Lanes.

Steep Lanes.

Trees grow out of nowhere.

Trees grow out of nowhere.

Trees grow out of nowhere.

Trees grow out of nowhere.

Trees grow out of nowhere.

Trees grow out of nowhere.

Next I walked to the Sun Yat-sen Museum. Of course, it was also closed, but again I have visited before. I remember being very impressed with the building itself. This museum is located in Kom Tong Hall at 7 Castle Road. The museum was opened in 2006 to commemorate the 140th birthday of the Chinese revolutionary leader, Dr Sun Yat-sen, who completed some of his schooling in Hong Kong. Sun Yat Sen was instrumental in the overthrow of the Qing dynasty during the Xinhai Revolution. Kom Tong Hall was built in 1914. It was named after its former owner, Ho Kom-tong, who was a younger brother of the prominent philanthropist Sir Robert Ho Tung, whose grave I saw recently in Happy Valley.

Dr Sun Yat Sen Museum.

Dr Sun Yat Sen Museum.

Dr Sun Yat Sen statue.

Dr Sun Yat Sen statue.

Then it was back on the escalators to my next stop at Rednaxela Terrace. I love the story of Rednaxela Terrace. This street was named after its original owner, a Mr Alexander, but while westerners read and write from left to write, Chinese people do so from right to left, so the street sign was accidentally transcribed backwards. They decided to keep the sign and just change the name of the street. Good idea, I think Rednaxela sounds lovely. This street is also known as the place where Jose Rizal once resided in Hong Kong. He is a national hero in the Philippines. His writings helped inspire the revolution against the Spanish colonial government in the Philippines.

what a great name!

what a great name!

Memorial to  Jose Rizal.

Memorial to Jose Rizal.

After a quick look at Rednaxela Terrace, it was back on the escalator again and on past Jamia Mosque which, because its gate was locked, was impossible to take a good picture of. Jamia Mosque is the oldest mosque in Hong Kong. It was built in 1890. Nearby streets are called Mosque street and Mosque Junction after it.

Escalator.

Escalator.

Jamia Mosque.

Jamia Mosque.

Jamia Mosque.

Jamia Mosque.

Jamia Mosque.

Jamia Mosque.

Jamia Mosque.

Jamia Mosque.

I hopped back on the escalators again and headed to Robinson Road which had some nice street art.

Riding Hong Kong's escalator system.

Riding Hong Kong's escalator system.

Street art on Robinson Road.

Street art on Robinson Road.

Street art on Robinson Road.

Street art on Robinson Road.

Street art on Robinson Road.

Street art on Robinson Road.

From Robinson Road I continued to the bitter end at Conduit Road, but there is really nothing to see on this stretch. It is just residential. I wanted to explore the old Chinese area near the Museum of Medical Sciences, but at the last minute decided I'd go back down the hill via the Hong Kong Botanical and Zoological Gardens. I thought there would be fewer stairs that way, but it wasn't really a good choice as the road network down was quite confusing. Hong Kong Botanical and Zoological Gardens is quite a nice place with lots of plants and trees, an aviary, monkeys and meerkats. However, the mammal enclosures were shut due to covid and on this visit there wasn't a huge amount to see. There's a view over Government House from here and a statue of King George VI. This bronze statue was created by famous British sculptor Gilbert Ledward. It was erected here in 1958 to commemorate Hong Kong’s 100th anniversary from 1842 to 1941.

Hong Kong Botanical and Zoological Gardens.

Hong Kong Botanical and Zoological Gardens.

Hong Kong Botanical and Zoological Gardens.

Hong Kong Botanical and Zoological Gardens.

Hong Kong Botanical and Zoological Gardens

Hong Kong Botanical and Zoological Gardens

Hong Kong Botanical and Zoological Gardens.

Hong Kong Botanical and Zoological Gardens.

Statue of King George VI in Hong Kong Botanical and Zoological Gardens.

Statue of King George VI in Hong Kong Botanical and Zoological Gardens.

Posted by irenevt 07:45 Archived in Hong Kong Comments (6)

All good things ........

It's almost time to go back to work.

sunny

I don't normally spend my holidays in Hong Kong. To be honest I'm usually longing to get out of it whenever I have a break, but thanks to covid there's really been no choice. If I go anywhere, I have to have three weeks compulsory quarantine in a hotel, fully paid for by me. In the summer I didn't enjoy staying here. It was too hot and we weren't allowed to swim anywhere, but this holiday, in the cooler months and with no crowds of tourists flocking in, I have really enjoyed looking around. I've discovered there are lots of beautiful places here and lots of places we have not visited yet. Thus, I have absolutely no wish to stop being a tourist and go back to work, but unfortunately, I go back tomorrow.

Well, this final weekend of freedom we used more of our hotel points to stay in The Park Lane, Causeway Bay, for one night. This is a nice hotel, right in the heart of the city, but overlooking Victoria Park and very quiet at night. We came on a room only basis, discovered they had a special offer for breakfast and afternoon tea, but didn't take it, as we planned to eat out in restaurants instead. Eating out, at the moment, must be done before 6pm as all restaurants have to close then, so it wasn't really compatible with afternoon tea.

Our room didn't have a good view, so I went up to the hotel's Skye Bar to look at theirs. I didn't want a drink there but the staff didn't mind me just coming in to take photos. The views are either over Victoria Park or Causeway Bay Marina and Typhoon Shelter. I thought they were pretty spectacular.

Our Room.

Our Room.

Christmas in the lobby.

Christmas in the lobby.

View from our window.

View from our window.

View from the Skye Bar.

View from the Skye Bar.

View from the Skye Bar.

View from the Skye Bar.

View from the Skye Bar.

View from the Skye Bar.

View from the Skye Bar.

View from the Skye Bar.

View from the Skye Bar.

View from the Skye Bar.

View from the Skye Bar.

View from the Skye Bar.

Outside the Skye Bar.

Outside the Skye Bar.

I tried to go to the Skye Bar to take pictures at night, too, but of course it was shut, so I just took them through the window which wasn't great as there was a lot of reflection, but it was better than nothing.

Nightime view over Victoria Park.

Nightime view over Victoria Park.

Nightime View.

Nightime View.

Nightime View.

Nightime View.

Causeway Bay nowadays is a built up, crowded shopping area with a huge Japanese Sogo store, Times Square, Hysan Place, Windsor House, Lee Gardens and many, many more shopping malls. It's also filled with restaurants and bars. Therefore, it is hard to imagine that it was at one time just a heavily silted bay with a little fishing village on it. Historically, Causeway Bay was a bay between North Point and East Point. Over the years more and more land reclamation has taken place here, so what we now know as Causeway Bay was actually once under the waters of Victoria Harbour. In 1841 the new British colonial government sold the first commercial plot of land in Hong Kong to the Jardine Matheson Company, right here in Causeway Bay. That's why there are street names like Jardine's Bazaar, and Jardine's Crescent here.

I spent my afternoon in Causeway Bay down by the waterfront. There is a marina and typhoon shelter here. The waters are filled with lots of sampans, houseboats and yachts. It's really very pretty.

Door to door service.

Door to door service.

Boats and Skyline.

Boats and Skyline.

Boats and Skyline.

Boats and Skyline.

I thought this was a houseboat, but just found out it is a floating Tin Hau Temple.

I thought this was a houseboat, but just found out it is a floating Tin Hau Temple.

Sampan Service.

Sampan Service.

Boats and Skyline.

Boats and Skyline.

Boats and Skyline.

Boats and Skyline.

Sampans.

Sampans.

I thought this was a houseboat, but just found out it is a floating Tin Hau Temple.

I thought this was a houseboat, but just found out it is a floating Tin Hau Temple.

The Floating Tin Hau Temple was originally located at the heart of the Pearl River Delta, but since 1955, it has been anchored in the Causeway Bay Typhoon Shelter. It is the only floating temple in Hong Kong. To visit it you must hail a sampan.

Sampans and Skyline.

Sampans and Skyline.

Sampans and Skyline.

Sampans and Skyline.

Sampans and Skyline.

Sampans and Skyline.

Sampans and Skyline.

Sampans and Skyline.

After enjoying our walk, Peter and I went out for an early dinner. We decided to eat in the King Ludwig Beer Hall. This is very close to our hotel. Obviously, with a name like that, it's a German restaurant. It's known for selling huge litre glasses of German beer and for hosting the October Fest celebrations in Hong Kong. Naturally Peter went for the almost unliftable litre glass. I just stuck to the usual half litre size. For dinner we shared a large appetizer plate with cold ham, pork belly, cheeses, olives, salad and an absolutely delicious pate. We also shared Nuremberg sausages and a pretzel.

Peter, happy with his beer.

Peter, happy with his beer.

Peter with the appetizer.

Peter with the appetizer.

Me with my pretzel.

Me with my pretzel.

Me with my food.

Me with my food.

Appetizers Platter.

Appetizers Platter.

Sausages.

Sausages.

Inside the restaurant.

Inside the restaurant.

Inside the restaurant.

Inside the restaurant.

After dinner I returned to the waterfront to see the harbour lit up at night. I like doing this as it's generally very colourful and peaceful by the water at night time.

Victoria Harbour at night.

Victoria Harbour at night.

Victoria Harbour at night.

Victoria Harbour at night.

Victoria Harbour at night.

Victoria Harbour at night.

Victoria Harbour at night.

Victoria Harbour at night.

I thought this was a houseboat, but just found out it is a floating Tin Hau Temple.

I thought this was a houseboat, but just found out it is a floating Tin Hau Temple.

Victoria Harbour at night.

Victoria Harbour at night.

Victoria Harbour at night.

Victoria Harbour at night.

Victoria Harbour at night.

Victoria Harbour at night.

Victoria Harbour at night.

Victoria Harbour at night.

Then I decided to get my neon fix by strolling around Causeway Bay's streets. Some are as brightly lit as day time. Causeway Bay is generally an extremely busy place and although there were still lots of people, for a Saturday night it was relatively empty due to covid and the fact that restaurants and bars close at 6pm.

This is food street which would normally be very busy.

This is food street which would normally be very busy.

Food Street.

Food Street.

Food Street.

Food Street.

There were various colourful paintings on the walls.

Painting.

Painting.

Painting.

Painting.

Painting.

Painting.

I then moved onto the predominantly shopping areas. While everything else is closed, shops are largely still open so there were people still wandering the streets and malls.

Sogo with its ever changing screen.

Sogo with its ever changing screen.

See it's changed already.

See it's changed already.

Colourful signs next to Sogo.

Colourful signs next to Sogo.

Night time Street.

Night time Street.

Narrow Lane.

Narrow Lane.

Signs, signs and more signs.

Signs, signs and more signs.

Taxi anyone?

Taxi anyone?

Brightly lit shop selling lucky red packets for Chinese New Year.

Brightly lit shop selling lucky red packets for Chinese New Year.

The streets were also dotted with Christmas displays. Not sure what was going on with Times Square's. It looked like a car had driven into a Christmas tree. Must have been something I missed

Christmas displays.

Christmas displays.

Christmas displays.

Christmas displays.

Christmas displays.

Christmas displays.

Christmas displays.

Christmas displays.

At one point I came across a long line of stationary trams. I wonder if this is where they are parked up for the night. I'd have thought they'd go into a depot, but I guess not.

Is this where trams go to sleep?

Is this where trams go to sleep?

Is this where trams go to sleep?

Is this where trams go to sleep?

Next morning we had a late check out at 1:30 which was handy because I wanted to go and see the noon day gun. I mean I've seen it before, but I've never been there at the right time to hear it being fired, so since I was so close, I thought I might as well go.

Before going there I took a walk through Victoria Park again. It's Sunday, maids day off, so there were a lot of maids around picnicking and dancing and enjoying the sunshine. Earlier this week one politician here called for maids to be locked in on Sundays so they don't violate social distancing. Personally, I hope she doesn't manage to do this. Again I noticed most of the maids were Indonesian. Not sure if there are now more Indonesian maids than Filipino ones here. I myself don't have a maid. The park had some lovely autumn colours and I liked a statue of two horses I've never noticed before.

Maids'Day Off.

Maids'Day Off.

Maids' Day Off.

Maids' Day Off.

Maids' Day Off.

Maids' Day Off.

Maids' Day Off.

Maids' Day Off.

Autumn Colours.

Autumn Colours.

Autumn Colours.

Autumn Colours.

Autumn Colours.

Autumn Colours.

Autumn Colours.

Autumn Colours.

Horse statue.

Horse statue.

The noon day gun is fired by an employee of the Jardine Matheson Company every day of the year at midday precisely. These gunshots once acted as time signals. This is the "Noonday Gun" mentioned in the Noël Coward song "Mad Dogs and Englishmen". The gun was certainly very, very loud!!!

The history of the noon day gun goes back to the 1860's. There's a famous legend about it. At that time whenever an important member of the Jardine Matheson company arrived or departed Hong Kong by boat, a company employee would fire a gun salute over Victoria Harbour from East Point. On one occasion a senior officer of the Royal Navy, who had just arrived in Hong Kong, was startled by the sudden gun fire. He was also offended by the fact that the gun salute was used for anyone other than royalty. He then issued a penalty to Jardine Matheson to fire the gun on a daily basis at noon in perpetuity. Nowadays this practice continues. The only time it was halted was during the Japanese Occupation of Hong Kong.

Noon Day Gun.

Noon Day Gun.

Non Day Gun.

Non Day Gun.

Noon Day Gun.

Noon Day Gun.

Noon Day Gun.

Noon Day Gun.

Noon Day Gun.

Noon Day Gun.

Noon Day Gun.

Noon Day Gun.

Finally, we went shopping in IKEA for new kitchen cabinets then headed to the Outback Steakhouse where we had Aussie fries and shrimp Caesar salad for lunch before going home.

Lunch in the Outback.

Lunch in the Outback.

Lunch in the Outback.

Lunch in the Outback.

Lunch in the Outback.

Lunch in the Outback.

Posted by irenevt 13:36 Archived in Hong Kong Comments (12)

Old Forts on the Eastern Stream.

New Year's Day 2021.

Happy New Year! I didn't really intend to go anywhere today. To be honest I woke up with a bit of a hangover, but I finally decided to cut my losses and go out. I wasn't in the mood for difficult or far, so I thought I'll stick to being on Lantau and just go look at Tung Chung Fort.

I've not been to Tung Chung Fort before, though I've seen it, because, at one point, we considered buying a house in the village next to the fort. In the end we were put off by the fact that several rooms in the house we were looking at had no windows and thus no natural light. We ended up buying in Discovery Bay instead.

Tung Chung is Chinese for Eastern Stream. It is located on the northwest coast of Lantau. It was originally a fishing village, right next to Tung Chung Bay and was also an important area of defence against pirates and foreign invaders.

Tung Chung Fort dates from the Shun Hei Era, which stretched from around 1174 to 1189. It was built to house around three hundred soldiers sent here to combat salt smugglers, who illegally traded salt from this area into Canton. Once the smuggling here was dealt with, many of these soldiers were sent to man the fortifications at Kowloon Walled City. During the Qing dynasty, pirates, such as Cheung Po Tsai, used Tung Chung Bay as their base and made use of the fort. Cheung Po Tsai is famous for having hidden his ill-gotten gains in a cave on Cheung Chau Island.

To be honest I felt Tung Chung Fort was rather run down and neglected and this is sad because I don't think Hong Kong has much in the way of heritage like this. It should be looked after. The outer walls of the fort are pretty much intact and you can wander all the way around the outside. The steps as you go around are huge and hell on the knees. My knees already hurt and I know I'll pay the full price tomorrow. There was an old lady walking the walls in front of me who had to be practically carried down every step, but good for her for still being brave enough to try and walk around the walls.

Inside the fort many of the buildings had shattered windows. There were lots of children from the nearby village playing in the fort, which is fair enough as it seemed to have been turned into a playground with basketball hoops. Perhaps this is left over from when it was a school. There's an Indian restaurant just outside the main gate.

Entrance to the Fort.

Entrance to the Fort.

Entrance to the fort.

Entrance to the fort.

Entrance to the fort

Entrance to the fort

Entrance to the fort.

Entrance to the fort.

Inside the fort.

Inside the fort.

Inside the fort.

Inside the fort.

Children playing inside the fort.

Children playing inside the fort.

Children playing inside the fort.

Children playing inside the fort.

Old reflects new.

Old reflects new.

Old reflects new.

Old reflects new.

Old reflects new.

Old reflects new.

Inside the fort.

Inside the fort.

Walking the walls.

Walking the walls.

Walking the walls.

Walking the walls.

Walking the walls

Walking the walls

Walking the walls.

Walking the walls.

Walking the walls.

Walking the walls.

In the shadow of the new.

In the shadow of the new.

Buildings inside the fort.

Buildings inside the fort.

Buildings inside the fort.

Buildings inside the fort.

Inside the fort.

Inside the fort.

Looking back on the fort.

Looking back on the fort.

As well as the old fort, Tung Chung has an old battery, lime kilns and temples. I visited the Tin Hau Temple which is located in Chek Lap Kok new village. Chek Lap Kok is Hong Kong's airport and it was built on an area of land reclamation and a partially levelled small island called Chek Lap Kok. The island had a small population, of around twenty families, who were relocated to this village. The islanders would originally have been farmers and fishermen. Their Tin Hau temple was dismantled and brought with them.
The original temple dates from 1823. It was dismantled in 1991 and rebuilt in 1994.

Gateway to Temple.

Gateway to Temple.

Tin Hau Temple.

Tin Hau Temple.

Tin Hau Temple.

Tin Hau Temple.

Tin Hau Temple.

Tin Hau Temple.

Tin Hau Temple.

Tin Hau Temple.

Temple Altar.

Temple Altar.

Although Tung Chung is now a built up new town with high rise and housing estates, there's still plenty of rural and greenery.

Rural Tung Chung.

Rural Tung Chung.

Autumn.

Autumn.

Autumn.

Autumn.

On the way back to Tung Chung's bus station, I took some pictures of the art work lining the underpass. It seemed to showcase the sights of Lantau.

Promoting the Big Buddha.

Promoting the Big Buddha.

Promoting Disneyland.

Promoting Disneyland.

Promoting the airport.

Promoting the airport.

Promoting Tai O.

Promoting Tai O.

Promoting Tung Chung Fort.

Promoting Tung Chung Fort.

Posted by irenevt 16:11 Archived in Hong Kong Comments (6)

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