A Travellerspoint blog

August 2022

Time Changes Everything.

In the failed pursuit of art.

overcast

I didn't originally plan to go walkabout today. I just woke up with itchy feet and decided I might as well go out and do something. After enjoying the artwork along the harbour in Central last week, I decided to see what was going on along the harbour in Tsim Sha Tsui.

I took the MTR to Tsim Sha Tsui East and exited into K11 Musea. The first time I visited here, I was trying to go to an exhibition. I was expecting K11 Musea to be just another typical Hong Kong, boring, we only sell extortionately priced designer stuff, type shopping mall. Instead I found it had lots of artwork and an outside garden area and I was really impressed. This time I went with visions of art and culture and wandered around thinking: "Why did I want to come here? It's just an overpriced shopping centre." The place itself had not changed at all, but I guess my expectations had.

K11 Musea from the outside.

K11 Musea from the outside.

The inner atrium of K11 Musea.

The inner atrium of K11 Musea.

The Inner Atrium.

The Inner Atrium.

The Giant Glass Ball.

The Giant Glass Ball.

The Giant Glass Ball.

The Giant Glass Ball.

Inside the giant glass ball.

Inside the giant glass ball.

Art work is dotted around. Sponge Bob.

Art work is dotted around. Sponge Bob.

Art work is dotted around. Brown Bears.

Art work is dotted around. Brown Bears.

Scary artwork.

Scary artwork.

In the garden a perfume display was being set up.

In the garden a perfume display was being set up.

For Jo Malone English Pear and Freesia Cologne.

For Jo Malone English Pear and Freesia Cologne.

I liked the peacock slide.

I liked the peacock slide.

And the peahen one.

And the peahen one.

After wandering around the mall for a while, I went outside onto the harbour front to see if there was any artwork on display here. There wasn't - nothing at all. Oh well, not to worry, I decided I would walk along the Avenue of Stars as far as Hung Hom anyway.

Now once again I discovered time had changed my perceptions. I walked along here last year, or the year before, on a Sunday and was amazed and delighted to find I had the whole place to myself. "How wonderful to be able to photograph the Bruce Lee statue without having to queue!" I had thought. This time, once again I had pretty much the whole of the Avenue of Stars, one of Hong Kong's biggest tourists draws, to myself. Only now I felt sorry for the cafes and bars along the front that were sitting empty and for the souvenir shops without a customer in sight. I hate crowds, but to see popular tourist sighs devoid of people for such a long time isn't good for the economy or for people's morale.

I photographed the main attractions even though I have done so before. I started with the statue of McDull. McDull is a cartoon pig that is loved by the Cantonese population here. He was created by Alice Mak and Brian Tse. McDull apparently grew up in the slums of Sham Shui Po and went through many typical everyday experiences that ordinary Hong Kongers can identify with.

McDull.

McDull.

Next I had a look at the Anita Mui statue. Anita was a very successful Cantopop singer and actress. She is sometimes referred to as the Daughter of Hong Kong. She died of cervical cancer tragically young at just forty years old.

Anita Mui.

Anita Mui.

Anita's statue is very close to Bruce Lee's statue. They are positioned rather strangely on opposite sides of a Starbucks Cafe. However, one advantage of their new positions is they have water barriers around them to stop people touching them or climbing on them. Before there used to be unsightly metal barriers for this reason.

Bruce Lee, the very famous, martial arts expert and actor, also died tragically young at just thirty-two.

Bruce Lee.

Bruce Lee.

Bruce Lee.

Bruce Lee.

Bruce Lee.

Bruce Lee.

Just past the statues, I walked up some steps to the Garden of Stars. This still contains two groups of statues connected to the film industry. They were supposed to be housed here temporarily while the Avenue of Stars was being redone, but because they look good with a harbour backdrop from here, they have been allowed to remain.

Art work.

Art work.

Lights, Camera, action.

Lights, Camera, action.

And we're rolling.

And we're rolling.

Harbour views

Harbour views

Harbour views.

Harbour views.

Back down on the Avenue of Stars I continued my walk. I passed another oddly placed sight, the dragon head fountain, which is sort of hidden behind a pillar for some unknown reason. There were some garden areas here where you could sit and enjoy harbour views. I did for a while till I needed to escape from the heat.

Dragon Fountain.

Dragon Fountain.

This hibiscus seemed to be more beautiful than any hibiscus has a right to be.

This hibiscus seemed to be more beautiful than any hibiscus has a right to be.

Escaping the heat made me want to go somewhere indoors for a while, so I headed off to the Museum of History and the Museum of Science. These museums are opposite each other. I quickly discovered I could not get in to the Museum of Science, because it is staging a special dinosaurs exhibition and due to the large numbers of people who want to see it, you have to reserve a space online to get in.

Dinosaur bones in front of the museums.

Dinosaur bones in front of the museums.

Science Museum.

Science Museum.

Science Museum.

Science Museum.

Science Museum.

Science Museum.

Science Museum.

Science Museum.

I got into the History Museum without any problems, but it is undergoing major renovations, so only a very small part of it was open. That part focused on the different tribes that make up the indigenous Hong Kong population and on typical Hong Kong sights and experiences from the past.

The History Museum.

The History Museum.

There was a section on traditional weddings. The bride traditionally wore red clothes for luck. White was a colour to be avoided, as it symbolises death. There were lots of rituals to follow such as serving tea to the elders, starting with the groom's parents.

This old sedan chair would have been used to carry a bride to her wedding ceremony.

This old sedan chair would have been used to carry a bride to her wedding ceremony.

The bride would have been dressed in clothes like these. Red is a lucky colour.

The bride would have been dressed in clothes like these. Red is a lucky colour.

There were some sections on Hong Kong's indigenous tribes. These are the Punti, Hoklo, Tanka and Hakka.

The Punti were the first to settle in this area in the eleventh century. They are known as the "original residents." They lived by farming. Then came the Hoklo, who originally came from Fujian. They lived by fishing and were known as "river people”. Next came the Tanka, known as “sea gypsies”. They lived full-time on their fishing boats. Finally, the Hakka arrived in 1688. They also lived by farming.

Hoklo boat.

Hoklo boat.

Fish drying.

Fish drying.

Traditional Hoklo Paddle Dance.

Traditional Hoklo Paddle Dance.

Tribal hat.

Tribal hat.

Child's clothing. It's Chinese but makes me think of Laplanders.

Child's clothing. It's Chinese but makes me think of Laplanders.

Typical Hakka Clothing.

Typical Hakka Clothing.

There was also a section on Hong Kong Memories. Typical homes, shops, cafes, restaurants were recreated in this section. I didn't really like the way part of the display was like a black and white sketch and part was made up of real objects. It was the black and white sketch part I didn't like.

Inside a typical home.

Inside a typical home.

Inside a traditional cafe.

Inside a traditional cafe.

Typical restaurant.

Typical restaurant.

Hardware Shop.

Hardware Shop.

Grocery Shop.

Grocery Shop.

Grocery Shop.

Grocery Shop.

Old Fashioned Barbershop.

Old Fashioned Barbershop.

One wall was decorated with traditional street scenes and Chinese art.

Painting of Hong Kong street scene.

Painting of Hong Kong street scene.

Hong Kong Art.

Hong Kong Art.

When I had cooled down, I returned to the waterfront. I passed a rather nice fountain on route. When I finally reached Hung Hom, I ran out of promenade and had to leave the waterfront. It was shaded here due to overhead roads. This meant several people were sitting around enjoying the relative coolness or fishing in the not so clean harbour waters.

Fountain in Tsim Sha Tsui East.

Fountain in Tsim Sha Tsui East.

Approaching Hung Hom.

Approaching Hung Hom.

Harbour viewed from the shade.

Harbour viewed from the shade.

Enjoying the shade.

Enjoying the shade.

I was now next to the Hong Kong Coliseum. This is a multipurpose indoor stadium which dates from 1983. It hosts sporting events, concerts and conventions and can seat 12,500 people. It's been in the news recently for all the wrong reasons. There was a concert here by Hong Kong boy band, Mirror. I'm not a fan personally, but you can't escape them here. Their images are everywhere. Anyway during their concert a huge screen fell down onto the stage. Two of the group's backing dancers were injured. One of them is still in hospital and may be paralyzed for life. A terrible thing to happen to anyone, but when you are young and fit and largely just starting out in life, totally tragic.

The Hong Kong Coliseum.

The Hong Kong Coliseum.

The Hong Kong Coliseum.

The Hong Kong Coliseum.

Hong Kong Coliseum is right next to Hung Hom Station, and I decided to go and see one more area before going home, so I got on a train and headed one stop to Homantin. I'd have walked, but I wasn't sure of the way. I wanted to visit the Kwun Yum Temple here. Kwun Yum is the goddess of mercy. She is worshipped by Taoists and Buddhists.

This temple was built in 1873. For Chinese people this is one of the most important Kwun Yum Temples in Hong Kong. It has quite an interesting history.

In 1909 a road was built close to the temple. When the road builders were digging, red water suddenly spouted out of the ground. The workers were superstitious and believed they had ruptured the vein of a dragon that inhabited the area. Laboratory tests showed that the red colour was actually due to a mixture of underground deposits of mercury and sulphur, but this did not calm the workers' fears, so they donated large sums of money to the Kwun Yum Temple in the hope this would cancel out any bad luck they had acquired.

During the second World War, the Hung Hom area was heavily bombed due to its proximity to the nearby Hutchinson Whampoa Dockyard. Civilians sheltered in the temple and a nearby school. Many people were killed or injured in the school, but the temple remained intact and those sheltering there were unharmed.

Every year on the 26th day of the first lunar month, the Kwun Yum Treasury is said to open. People flock to this temple in droves. They write down their names, birthdays and how much money they want on a piece of paper, pray to the goddess then select a red packet. Inside the packet is a piece of paper with an amount of money written on it. This is the amount they can 'borrow' from Kwun Yum. Of course the money is not real, but I guess if the goddess is prepared to lend you a lot, it symbolises good fortune.

I'm not sure really why I like visiting Chinese temples. I'm pretty much always in everyone's way, but for some reason I find them very interesting. In fact I guess I find all religious buildings interesting.

Sculpture near Homantin Station.

Sculpture near Homantin Station.

Kwun Yum Temple, Hung Hom.

Kwun Yum Temple, Hung Hom.

Kwun Yum altar.

Kwun Yum altar.

Kwun Yum altar.

Kwun Yum altar.

Lightning Incense.

Lightning Incense.

Placing incense.

Placing incense.

Worshippers.

Worshippers.

Shrine inside the temple.

Shrine inside the temple.

Another shrine.

Another shrine.

Revolving Buddha images.

Revolving Buddha images.

Making lotus flowers from red packets. The lotus flower is the symbol of Kwun Yum.

Making lotus flowers from red packets. The lotus flower is the symbol of Kwun Yum.

Coils of incense.

Coils of incense.

Near temples there are always shops selling offerings such as flowers, incense etc.

Near temples there are always shops selling offerings such as flowers, incense etc.

Here's another one.

Here's another one.

And another.

And another.

Further away from the temple there were more normal shops. Some of these were very colourful, laden down with fruit and vegetables.

Vegetables.

Vegetables.

Fruit.

Fruit.

On my way to the MTR, I passed a temple in the middle of the pavement. This is the Fuk Tak Temple, which is dedicated to the earth god. The temple was founded in the late nineteenth century before Hung Hom became built up. The authorities wanted to demolish it, as it was in the way of their urbanisation plans, but the locals were not happy with that idea, so Hung Hom was pretty much built around the temple, hence its weird location. I believe this temple was damaged in the war, then later restored.

Fuk Tak Temple.

Fuk Tak Temple.

Fuk Tak Temple.

Fuk Tak Temple.

After that I realized I had ended up back in Whampoa again. I found the nearest MTR and headed home.

Posted by irenevt 09:02 Archived in Hong Kong Comments (4)

From the Outback, to the Jungle, then down to the Sea.

Night out in Causeway Bay followed by a walk from Central to Wan Chai.

sunny

Thursday 18th August was get together time again. Peter and I went out to dinner with five of my former workmates in the Outback Restaurant in Causeway Bay. This, as you may have guessed, is an Australian themed chain restaurant. Peter, who doesn't eat much nowadays, was happy with his big blokes (large beers) and Aussie fries. I also had a big bloke and Alice Springs chicken. I was too busy talking to remember to photograph the food. It was lovely to catch up with people once again.

All of us together.

All of us together.

Peter and Linda.

Peter and Linda.

Yang, Jason and I.

Yang, Jason and I.

Linda, Suman and Jonathan.

Linda, Suman and Jonathan.

Yang and Jason.

Yang and Jason.

Yang with her seafood pasta.

Yang with her seafood pasta.

Suman and Jonathan.

Suman and Jonathan.

Linda and Suman.

Linda and Suman.

Suman and Jonathan.

Suman and Jonathan.

Today, after being stuck in most of the week, first because it was so hot and then because of a typhoon, I headed out to the IFC Building in Central. I wanted to take a look at 'The Wild Wonders' Exhibition. This is an entire jungle filled with origami animals such as sloths, tapirs, crocodiles, tamarins, toucans and jaguars.

The Wild Wonders were created by Stickyline. Stickyline are two local Hong Kong paper craft artists, Mic Leong and Soilworm Lai, who got together in 2011. Since then, they have created many art installations, giant sculptures and stage productions from paper, using folding and layering techniques. 'The Wild Wonders' Exhibition came complete with jungle sounds and moving models. I personally loved it.

The Wild Wonders Information.

The Wild Wonders Information.

An area of jungle.

An area of jungle.

Passing human for size comparison.

Passing human for size comparison.

The Jaguar.

The Jaguar.

The Jaguar.

The Jaguar.

The Crocodile.

The Crocodile.

The Crocodile.

The Crocodile.

The Tapir.

The Tapir.

The Tapir.

The Tapir.

The Tapir.

The Tapir.

The Toucans.

The Toucans.

The golden lion tamarin.

The golden lion tamarin.

The golden lion tamarin.

The golden lion tamarin.

The golden lion tamarin.

The golden lion tamarin.

The sloth.

The sloth.

After that, although it was a very hot day, I took a walk along the waterfront from the star ferry pier in Central to the exhibition centre in Wan Chai. I started from the area next to the Maritime Museum and Hong Kong's big wheel.

On the harbour outside the Maritime Museum.

On the harbour outside the Maritime Museum.

The Hong Kong Observation Wheel.

The Hong Kong Observation Wheel.

At the moment there are several different art events going on along the shores of Victoria Harbour. Today I looked at those in Tamar. There are others in Hung Hom and in Tsim Sha Tsui. I may try to get to these later. The ones I saw today were on the theme of Art in Science.

The Arts in Science exhibition was in Tamar Park in front of the government headquarters. At first I thought the exhibition was being dismantled and that I had arrived on its last day. Later, when I got back home, I discovered the exhibition continues until December. I then realized that some of the exhibition had been roped off, covered up, or had workmen all round it, as we have just had a force eight typhoon and parts of the exhibition were damaged during it. The workmen, that I thought were dismantling things, were actually repairing them.

Government headquarters in Tamar in the background.

Government headquarters in Tamar in the background.

This one is so shiny it made me think of Christmas at first.

This one is so shiny it made me think of Christmas at first.

But it's actually based on different kinds of coral. It is called 'Coral Fractals'.

But it's actually based on different kinds of coral. It is called 'Coral Fractals'.

Coral Fractals.

Coral Fractals.

Coral Fractals.

Coral Fractals.

This one is called 'Loving Home'.

This one is called 'Loving Home'.

Loving Home.

Loving Home.

I guess this is something to do with planets. It is called 'Obscure Bond'.

I guess this is something to do with planets. It is called 'Obscure Bond'.

Obscure Bond. I loved all the bright colours.

Obscure Bond. I loved all the bright colours.

This one is called 'Scenic Rockery'.

This one is called 'Scenic Rockery'.

This is 'Eternal Light of a Seashell'. I thought this was being newly laid out, but actually I think it was being repaired.

This is 'Eternal Light of a Seashell'. I thought this was being newly laid out, but actually I think it was being repaired.

Eternal Light of a Seashell.

Eternal Light of a Seashell.

When I read up on 'Water Capsule Submarine' later, it seems you are to imagine you are inside a raindrop and look at the view as if from under water. I did not know this at the time. My main perception, as I wandered the exhibit was how mind numbingly hot it was inside it.

Water Capsule Submarine.

Water Capsule Submarine.

Inside Water Capsule Submarine.

Inside Water Capsule Submarine.

Inside Water Capsule Submarine.

Inside Water Capsule Submarine.

The next exhibit was called 'In the Wind'. From the pictures I saw in the exhibition's online brochure, there should be different shaped objects on the end of each spike, but ironically they seem to have all blown off in the number eight typhoon.

This is called 'In the Wind'.

This is called 'In the Wind'.

In the Wind.

In the Wind.

At one point I noticed a sign saying 'The Connector'. This refers to a pathway between Admiralty’s Tamar Park and Hong Kong Convention Centre in Wan Chai. The Connector has been done up on the theme of summer beach parties and includes a fake beach, deck chairs, palm trees and summer themed miniatures.

Connector.

Connector.

Connector.

Connector.

I guess this one is all about enjoying summer picnics.

I guess this one is all about enjoying summer picnics.

This is a seating area done up as Victoria Harbour beach complete with fake sand, sandcastles and a flamingo.

This is a seating area done up as Victoria Harbour beach complete with fake sand, sandcastles and a flamingo.

On the summer theme palm trees and sunglasses.

On the summer theme palm trees and sunglasses.

Hong Kong Miniatures Art in front of the harbour.

Hong Kong Miniatures Art in front of the harbour.

Hong Kong Miniatures.

Hong Kong Miniatures.

Fairy Picnic Table.

Fairy Picnic Table.

Art on the waterfront.

Art on the waterfront.

Fisherman.

Fisherman.

Beach fun.

Beach fun.

Inside beach fun.

Inside beach fun.

What's on the telly today?

What's on the telly today?

I also noticed various signs for an Olympic Virtual Run. Virtual, as due to COVID regulations here, large gatherings are banned. I'm not entirely sure how a virtual run works, but it does an attractive sign post.

2022 Olympics Day.

2022 Olympics Day.

Olympic Day.

Olympic Day.

There were also some signs celebrating twenty-five years since the handover of Hong Kong to China. There are various exhibits related to this dotted around the city.

25th Anniversary.

25th Anniversary.

This is celebrating 25 years since the handover.

This is celebrating 25 years since the handover.

I walked as far as the exhibition centre in Wan Chai. I would have loved to walk further, but it was just too hot. I had a look at the golden Bauhinia, symbol of Hong Kong in front of the exhibition centre. It's on our flags and on our money. I also saw the Aqua Luna, a beautiful red-sailed Chinese junk which offers tours of the harbour.

Exhibition Centre.

Exhibition Centre.

Golden Bauhinia.

Golden Bauhinia.

Chinese and Hong Kong flags.

Chinese and Hong Kong flags.

The Aqua Luna Junk outside the Exhibition Centre.

The Aqua Luna Junk outside the Exhibition Centre.

At this point I could have headed to the MTR in Wan Chai, but I wanted to return to the IFC and shop in City super Supermarket. Peter had ordered me to come home brandishing a baguette, so I retraced my steps before heading home.

Posted by irenevt 14:03 Archived in Hong Kong Comments (2)

Heaven on Earth.

Exploring the Shing Mun Valley Park.

rain

Waterfall.

Waterfall.

I often walk through the park, in Discovery Bay where I live, when I am on my way to the Wellcome Supermarket. On these walks, I keep seeing lots of water birds around the ponds' area. Every time I see them, I think: "Wish I'd remembered to bring my camera." But then I always forget. Well on Wednesday I finally remembered. Yeah me!!!!

The birds were out in force and I was especially delighted to see some posing on or near the bird statues that are positioned in the ponds.

This chap is clearly looking for his lunch.

This chap is clearly looking for his lunch.

Another handsome chappie.

Another handsome chappie.

Each pretending the other doesn't exist.

Each pretending the other doesn't exist.

This little chappie is perfectly happy to pose with his arty farty friends.

This little chappie is perfectly happy to pose with his arty farty friends.

A bit later I was photographing a plant when I turned round and was face to face with a gorgeous lizard. He was so well camouflaged, I could easily have missed him. I love, love, love lizards.

I was looking at this plant when I suddenly noticed this little chappie behind me...

I was looking at this plant when I suddenly noticed this little chappie behind me...

I love lizards.

I love lizards.

Just look at those little hands.

Just look at those little hands.

After I took lots of photos of this lizard, it looked at me as if to say OK enough.

After I took lots of photos of this lizard, it looked at me as if to say OK enough.

It was a clear day, so I took a couple of zoom shots of Hong Kong Island.

Looking towards Hong Kong Island.

Looking towards Hong Kong Island.

Looking towards Hong Kong Island.

Looking towards Hong Kong Island.

Today, I headed to Tai Wo Hau Station to go to Shing Mun Valley Park. To get there, go out of exit B, then go right, cross Kwok Shui Road and then go left. Walk to Texaco Road North and go right. After a couple of minutes you will reach Shing Mun Valley Public Swimming Pool. The park is just behind it on the right.

Tai Wo Hau Station.

Tai Wo Hau Station.

That's what I should have done. Of course I did go the wrong way once and when I did, I ended up in a little village. It was interesting, but unfortunately when I got there, the rain was pelting down.

I headed up these steps that was the wrong way. I should have gone left instead.

I headed up these steps that was the wrong way. I should have gone left instead.

This shrine is at the top of the stairs.

This shrine is at the top of the stairs.

I think this is also a little shrine.

I think this is also a little shrine.

There were bird cages hanging outside village houses.

There were bird cages hanging outside village houses.

After my diversion I retraced my steps and found the correct way. Near the entrance to the park there were some fantastic old trees.

Art work in the subway.

Art work in the subway.

Trees growing into the wall.

Trees growing into the wall.

I loved this path. It was so creepy in the rain.

I loved this path. It was so creepy in the rain.

What a beautiful tree.

What a beautiful tree.

What a beautiful tree.

What a beautiful tree.

And this one.

And this one.

Shing Mun Valley Park Swimming Pool.

Shing Mun Valley Park Swimming Pool.

I have read reviews of the Shing Mun Valley Park and they honestly do not do it justice. It is definitely up there as one of the most beautiful parks in Hong Kong. In fact I would go as far as to describe it as Heaven on Earth, that's how lovely it was and I visited during a torrential downpour.

The Shing Mun Valley Park occupies an area of 10.73 hectares. It was built between 1997 and 1998 and is located on the site of the former Cheung Pei Shan Temporary Housing Area. At one end of the park there is a large public swimming pool. Other sporting facilities here include: tennis courts, a 7-a-side hard surfaced soccer pitch, a basketball court, a fitness corner for the elderly and a children's play area.

Map of park.

Map of park.

However, it wasn't the sports facilities I had come to see, it was the area around the water features. This park has ponds, streams, waterfalls and fountains. It is absolutely brimming over with beautiful flowers and it has cute little features such as animal statues, Grecian urns and Japanese style stone lanterns.

Japanese stone lantern.

Japanese stone lantern.

Japanese water feature.

Japanese water feature.

Animal log.

Animal log.

Animal log.

Animal log.

Weasels.

Weasels.

All the water features are interconnected with ponds feeding into lower level ponds via a series of artificial waterfalls. It was all beautifully done. There were gardeners out working everywhere. I'd imagine it takes an army of gardeners to keep this park in tip top condition.

One of the many hardworking park workers.

One of the many hardworking park workers.

Sunken Bridge on lower pond.

Sunken Bridge on lower pond.

Turtle on bridge in lower pond.

Turtle on bridge in lower pond.

Pigeon near lower pond.

Pigeon near lower pond.

Looking over the lower central pond.

Looking over the lower central pond.

Waterfall and pink flowers.

Waterfall and pink flowers.

Pink flowers and waterfall.

Pink flowers and waterfall.

Boat and Waterfall.

Boat and Waterfall.

Boat of rushes.

Boat of rushes.

White flowers near the waterfall.

White flowers near the waterfall.

Butterfly circle.

Butterfly circle.

This was the biggest waterfall on the upper central pond.

This was the biggest waterfall on the upper central pond.

Lights and waterfall in upper central pond.

Lights and waterfall in upper central pond.

Lights on the water.

Lights on the water.

Upper Pond. The lotus flowers are at its far end.

Upper Pond. The lotus flowers are at its far end.

Upper Pond with fountain.

Upper Pond with fountain.

Lords of all they survey.

Lords of all they survey.

I actually went around the park several times as it was pouring when I arrived. It looked like it may rain all day, so I went around anyway and got utterly drenched. Then when it stopped raining, I went around it all again. It started pouring when I was half way round, so I took shelter, then went round a third time when the rain stopped again. The funny thing was when I went round in the rain, I saw hardly anyone, but once it stopped raining, photographers instantly appeared from everywhere. There were so many of them and they all had really fancy cameras. Most of them had come to photograph the park's huge lotus flowers, but there were many other beautiful flowers everywhere.

Photographers out in force.

Photographers out in force.

Indian rhododendron, Shing Mun Valley Park, Hong Kong

Indian rhododendron, Shing Mun Valley Park, Hong Kong

Purple flowers among palm trees.

Purple flowers among palm trees.

I think this is Brazilian Red Cloak.

I think this is Brazilian Red Cloak.

Miagos Bush.

Miagos Bush.

Rose, apparently these are at their best here in autumn. I sense a return visit coming on.

Rose, apparently these are at their best here in autumn. I sense a return visit coming on.

Rose.

Rose.

Wet purple flower.

Wet purple flower.

Purple flower dripping with rain.

Purple flower dripping with rain.

Purple flower.

Purple flower.

Marsh Blue Violet.

Marsh Blue Violet.

Crape Jasmine.

Crape Jasmine.

White flower. I think this is a rain lily.

White flower. I think this is a rain lily.

Red flower.

Red flower.

Orchid.

Orchid.

Orchid.

Orchid.

Chinese dwarf banana plant.

Chinese dwarf banana plant.

Beautiful flowers.

Beautiful flowers.

Bouganvilia.

Bouganvilia.

There were posters up showing which flowers are famous here in each season. Summer is apparently the time of the lotus flower. It recommends viewing these in June and July, so I'm slightly late, but there were still enough beautiful lotus flowers to keep me happy.

Seasons' Poster.

Seasons' Poster.

Lotus flowers normally grow in flood plains or the delta areas of rivers. They produce thousands of seeds each year and while some of these sprout immediately or are eaten by wildlife, a few lie dormant for many many years. They finally germinate under favourable conditions and form their own lotus colony. The oldest recorded lotus germination was in northeastern China from seeds that were around a thousand three hundred years old. Because the seeds can stay dormant for such a long time, the Chinese regard the lotus flower as the symbol of longevity. It's certainly extremely elegant.

Hiding lotus blossom.

Hiding lotus blossom.

Lotus bud.

Lotus bud.

Lotus Blossom.

Lotus Blossom.

Lotus Blossom closer up.

Lotus Blossom closer up.

Lotus Blossom.

Lotus Blossom.

Lotus Blossom back view.

Lotus Blossom back view.

Lotus Blossom.

Lotus Blossom.

Lotus Blossom and seed pod.

Lotus Blossom and seed pod.

Lotus Blossom.

Lotus Blossom.

Lotus Blossom.

Lotus Blossom.

Lotus Seeds.

Lotus Seeds.

Yes, I do know I got rather carried away on the photographing flowers front, that's why I ended up so drenched, I had to wring out my clothes while still wearing them.

Back at the entrance, where the rose garden is, I discovered lots of epiphytes growing on the trees. I really like these. Epiphytes have no roots or any attachment to the ground. They grow out of other plants, but are not parasitic on them. They are just using them for support.

This area also had a lovely statue. There were plenty of shelters to rest in here and some attractive fountains.

Statue.

Statue.

Epiphyte.

Epiphyte.

Epiphyte.

Epiphyte.

Epiphyte.

Epiphyte.

Shelter.

Shelter.

Fountains.

Fountains.

Park decoration.

Park decoration.

When I got on the train to go home, I phoned Peter and mentioned that I was soaking wet. He was surprised as it had stayed dry and sunny in Discovery Bay. I looked around the train and saw I was the only soaking wet person on there. In Tsuen Wan, everyone had been soaking and I sort of blended in. I suddenly felt rather self-conscious. About half an hour after I got home the weather caught up with me as thunder lightning and torrential rain descended on Discovery Bay, too.

Posted by irenevt 05:14 Archived in Hong Kong Comments (6)

Wandering the Wonders of Whampoa.

Sightseeing and lunch with a friend.

sunny

I know I probably sound like a broken record, but the weather in Hong Kong recently has varied between unbearably hot and torrential rain, so I have been spending a lot of time indoors. I have not been taking many photos, but I liked the flowers below which I passed on a rainy day walk.

Flowers in Discovery Bay on one of the few rainy days when I ventured outside.

Flowers in Discovery Bay on one of the few rainy days when I ventured outside.

Today, I finally got to go out. Yippee!! I returned to the Whampoa area of Hong Kong to spend the day with my friend, Iris. I remember originally coming here years ago, shortly after Peter and I arrived for his assistant education officer post in 1996. Then a few months ago, I returned for a legal matter, but on that occasion, I only had a very brief look around, as it was pouring with rain. So, when my friend, Iris, and I were looking for a place to explore and photograph, Whampoa popped into my mind and I am very glad it did, as we have just spent a lovely, relaxing day here.

Before meeting Iris, I took some photos in the MTR station. I love the fact that Hong Kong keeps adding more and more art to its underground and the artwork in Whampoa reflected the area's history and ship building past.

Whampoa Sign.

Whampoa Sign.

Art in the MTR. Rural village to housing estate.

Art in the MTR. Rural village to housing estate.

Before the development of the shipyards this area was a village where people would have farmed the land.

Before the development of the shipyards this area was a village where people would have farmed the land.

Whampoa has gone from a boatyard to a residential area.

Whampoa has gone from a boatyard to a residential area.

This shows the old Hutchinson Whampoa Dockyard building which has long since been demolished.

This shows the old Hutchinson Whampoa Dockyard building which has long since been demolished.

Iris and I met at exit C2 of Whampoa MTR station, so we could have a look at the Whampoa boat. This concrete boat, surrounded by housing blocks, is actually a shopping centre, but its nautical design reflects the fact that this whole area was once the Hutchinson Whampoa Ship Building Yard. The boat is permanently moored, shall we say, on the the former site of Dockyard One. Around the boat there are some colourful structures to walk through and there is an old cannon which was abandoned here during the refit of a British naval vessel.

The Whampoa surrounded by houses.

The Whampoa surrounded by houses.

The Whampoa Ship.

The Whampoa Ship.

Iris and I at The Whampoa Mall.

Iris and I at The Whampoa Mall.

Iris in the archway.

Iris in the archway.

Seahorse decorations around the door of the shopping centre.

Seahorse decorations around the door of the shopping centre.

Old cannon in front of the boat.

Old cannon in front of the boat.

Colourful structures surround the boat.

Colourful structures surround the boat.

Iris in her rainbow.

Iris in her rainbow.

On my last visit I had not realised that it was possible to go onto the top deck of this ship, but Iris enquired about this at the information desk and found out that we could get there in the lift.

View from the top of the ship.

View from the top of the ship.

On top of the ship.

On top of the ship.

On top of the ship.

On top of the ship.

When we were done with the boat, we headed off to the nearby Hutchinson Park. On the way we passed more malls and lots of artwork that has been added in recent years to beautify the area.

Archway.

Archway.

Effort has gone in to beautifying this area with artworks dotted all around.

Effort has gone in to beautifying this area with artworks dotted all around.

Entrance to one of the many malls here. This one is called Treasure World.

Entrance to one of the many malls here. This one is called Treasure World.

Hutchinson Park is a small Chinese style park and, because it was a Sunday, it was filled with Filipinas enjoying their day off. This park first opened in 1991. It centres around a pond and some streams. There are lots of little bridges to cross and several shady pavilions to sit in. There are traditional Chinese moon gates on all sides. These are guarded by a variety of styles of Chinese lions. There are lots of beautiful trees with hanging roots, colourful flowers and more turtles than I have ever seen in my whole life. I'm confident Henna on Trek would like it here, as she likes turtles. There's also a tai chi area, some children's play areas, elderly exercise stations and toilets. This park was a relaxing place for Iris and I to catch up on all the gossip and on what we have been doing since we last met.

Entrance to Hutchinson Park.

Entrance to Hutchinson Park.

Iris at the entry gate.

Iris at the entry gate.

Lions and cubs.

Lions and cubs.

Moon gate.

Moon gate.

Iris at the moon gate.

Iris at the moon gate.

Me at the moon gate.

Me at the moon gate.

Bridge and stream in Hutchinson Park.

Bridge and stream in Hutchinson Park.

Looking down at a bridge.

Looking down at a bridge.

Buildings and ponds.

Buildings and ponds.

Clouds reflected in a pond.

Clouds reflected in a pond.

Turtles everywhere.

Turtles everywhere.

Turtles in Hutchinson Park.

Turtles in Hutchinson Park.

Pavilion on a hill.

Pavilion on a hill.

Iris with a giant tree.

Iris with a giant tree.

Me under a tree.

Me under a tree.

Iris likes trees; I like flowers.

Iris likes trees; I like flowers.

Colourful flowers..

Colourful flowers..

This pavilion was so loud with so many maids chatting on it.

This pavilion was so loud with so many maids chatting on it.

When we had seen it all, we decided to go and have lunch. I got to choose the type of food we would have and so I opted for Chinese. I love eating Chinese food with Chinese people, as they know exactly what they are doing in those huge cavernous Chinese restaurants, while I really do not. We decided to treat ourselves to some delicious dim sum.

We went into the Laguna Verde Mall and ate in the Celestial Palace Restaurant. After our visit I looked at reviews of this mall and found many people did not like it, as they said it was too empty and just had a supermarket and places to eat. For me all these things made it perfect. I hate crowds, am delighted to find places to eat and drink you don't need to queue for and, although I didn't go into it, find the idea of a supermarket with no queues heaven on Earth. I'd come here just to shop if it wasn't so far from my home.

A Chinese meal always commences with the diners thoroughly washing all the plates and crockery that are already positioned on the table, in a basin of hot water which is provided for this purpose. I have not come across this custom elsewhere, but I guess it makes perfect sense and has probably saved many people from tummy bugs.

We ordered jasmine tea which was very refreshing on such a hot day, shrimp dumplings, which were my personal favourite of the dim sum we had, choi sum, a leafy green vegetable, which was lovely and crisp, beef meatballs, noodle rolls with a vegetable filling. This one was crunchy, which I wasn't expecting, but it was very pleasant. Finally, we had Iris's favourite dish which was actually a kind of spiced sponge cake. It was absolutely delicious. The restaurant had a great view over Victoria Harbour. We had a look at the view before taking our seat, as our seat wasn't near the window. I reckon that was probably a good thing as it got us out of the very bright sunshine for a while.

View from the restaurant.

View from the restaurant.

Inside the restaurant.

Inside the restaurant.

Iris preparing the utensils.

Iris preparing the utensils.

Healthy Choi sum.

Healthy Choi sum.

Shrimp dumplings, choi sum, noodle rolls, meatballs and cake. A very tasty meal.

Shrimp dumplings, choi sum, noodle rolls, meatballs and cake. A very tasty meal.

An excellent lunch.

An excellent lunch.

Iris and I in the restaurant.

Iris and I in the restaurant.

When we were finished eating, and by that time I personally was utterly stuffed senseless, we went for a walk along the waterfront. I reckon this would be an expensive area to live in. There are beautiful flats which must have fantastic harbour views. The first place we went to had modelled itself on Saint Mark's Square Venice, complete with bell ringing statues and bridges. We later passed a lovely infinity style swimming pool, which I felt pretty tempted to try and gate crash. That pool belonged to Laguna Verde, but there was a large public pool nearby. We couldn't see it properly from where we were, but I bet it would be worth a visit.

Did we just walk as far as Venice?

Did we just walk as far as Venice?

Laguna Verde.

Laguna Verde.

Me in front of the bridge at Laguna Verde.

Me in front of the bridge at Laguna Verde.

Iris in front of Laguna Verde.

Iris in front of Laguna Verde.

Harbour front viewed from Laguna Verde.

Harbour front viewed from Laguna Verde.

There were a couple of ferry piers in this area. We noticed that one seemed to offer lunch and dinner harbour cruises and even a cruise in which to enjoy the sound and light show. We also noticed someone was swimming in the harbour. I have seen that before, but it always surprises me, as the water is unfortunately quite dirty, quite rough and plied by many boats.

I think this old pier isn't used any more.

I think this old pier isn't used any more.

Ferry on the Harbour front.

Ferry on the Harbour front.

Me at the waterfront.

Me at the waterfront.

Iris by the waterfront.

Iris by the waterfront.

On the waterfront.

On the waterfront.

Harbour front walkway.

Harbour front walkway.

Unfortunately, there was a lot of rubbish in the harbour after all the rain we have had.

Unfortunately, there was a lot of rubbish in the harbour after all the rain we have had.

This boat does lunch and dinner cruises.

This boat does lunch and dinner cruises.

Fishing on the waterfront.

Fishing on the waterfront.

Once again the area had been beautified with art work. This time it was jungle themed. On our first visit many years ago this area was quite drab without all the artwork.

Jungle by the waterfront.

Jungle by the waterfront.

After enjoying the harbour front it was time for me to head home and for Iris to head off to visit her brother who lives nearby. It had been a lovely relaxing and memorable day.

Posted by irenevt 06:35 Archived in Hong Kong Comments (4)

Just a Rainy Day in Tsim Sha Tsui.

A Visit to the Hong Kong Museum of Art.

storm

Flowers on Signal Hill.

Flowers on Signal Hill.

I've probably said it many times before, but summer is the most unpleasant of the seasons here. The weather is either bright and sunny but with really high temperatures and high humidity, so that you feel exhausted just walking a few metres, or it's pitch black, pouring with rain and thunder and lightning. Throw in the occasional devastating typhoon and you will understand why most people here cannot wait for autumn to return.

Yesterday, was the first hot and sunny day after about a week of rain, so I went swimming, but, maybe I am just a moaner, I was really irritable. The water in the pool was like stepping into a hot bath and it was way too busy, as everyone was trying to take advantage of the one non-rainy day. Today I woke up to torrential rain, thunder and lightning, but I still went out, as I have been feeling a bit stir crazy of late.

I decided I would start by taking a quick look at Signal Hill Park in Minden Row, Tsim Sha Tsui. I've been meaning to do this for a while. To get there I took the MTR to Tsim Sha Tsui and exited through exit L1. I then went left and left again up a flight of stairs. Signal Hill Park, which is also known as Blackhead Point, is at the top of these stairs. There's a painting on the wall at the bottom of the hill to indicate its presence, but this was obscured by a construction site, so I didn't bother photographing it.

Sign for the tower.

Sign for the tower.

Signal Hill is around 40 metres high. First, you climb up a slope, then a few flights of steep steps. At the top there is an old signal tower. It is possible to go inside, but, naturally being me, I went when it was closed. The opening hours for the tower are: 9:00 to 11:00 am and 4:00 to 6:00 pm daily.

Signal Hill Park.

Signal Hill Park.

Flowers in the park.

Flowers in the park.

Flowers in the park.

Flowers in the park.

The Edwardian red brick signal tower located here was built in 1907 by the Hong Kong Observatory. Originally it housed a time-ball apparatus. This apparatus had previously been located in the Round House of the Marine Police Headquarters, which is now Heritage 1881.

Signal Tower.

Signal Tower.

Signal Tower.

Signal Tower.

The purpose of the time ball apparatus was to signal accurate time to sailors and the general public, so they could set their clocks etc by it. The time-ball service at Signal Tower began on 8th January 1908 and ended on 30th June 1933. By that time improved technology had rendered it obsolete.

The original Signal Tower was only three stories high, but an additional story was added in 1927. This brought the tower to a height of sixty-two feet and made it more visible to incoming vessels. From 1908 to 1920, the time ball was dropped just once a day. This process involved raising a hollow copper ball, which was six feet in diameter, to the top of a mast using a hand winch. Then at exactly 1 pm the ball was released and fell to the bottom of the mast. Later, between 1920 and 1933, the time ball was dropped twice a day at 10 am and 4 pm.

During World War Two, Signal Hill Tower was used as an ammunition store. Nowadays Signal Hill Tower is a Grade 1 listed building. In addition to the tower, there are also remains of an old gun battery here. Apparently this housed four guns. During the war, it is believed anti-aircraft guns were placed here. In peace times there were ceremonial cannons, used to give gun salutes. The soldiers stationed up here were tasked with monitoring the positions of vessels entering and leaving Victoria Harbour.

Gun battery.

Gun battery.

Gun battery.

Gun battery.

There are views over Victoria Harbour from Signal Hill Park, though it certainly does not have the best vantage point any more due to land reclamation and tall buildings on the shoreline. There is a little pavilion to sit in at the top of the hill.

The pavilion.

The pavilion.

View over the harbour.

View over the harbour.

View from the park.

View from the park.

There certainly isn't enough at Signal Hill to justify it as an outing in itself, but if you are ever in Tsim Sha Tsui for another reason, it is worth a look.

It didn't take long before the torrential rain, thunder and lightning started up again. I decided any further explorations were going to have to be indoor ones, so I headed off to the Hong Kong Museum of Art. I don't usually enjoy museums, but every now and then I am in the right mood for one. I loved it here and spent hours looking around. On the way I passed the K11 Musea Shopping Mall and the Space Museum.

K11 Musea, part museum, part shopping centre.

K11 Musea, part museum, part shopping centre.

Sculpture and Space Museum.

Sculpture and Space Museum.

I think this statue looks like deer, but its reflection looks like a spider.

I think this statue looks like deer, but its reflection looks like a spider.

Fountain with flowers.

Fountain with flowers.

The Hong Kong Museum of Art began life in 1962 as the City Museum and Art Gallery and was located in the City Hall, Central. In 1975 the museum was divided into two parts: the Hong Kong Museum of History and the Hong Kong Museum of Art. Later in 1991 the Hong Kong Museum of Art moved to these new custom built premises at 10 Salisbury Road, Tsim Sha Tsui. First and foremost I loved the building. It's very modern, extremely spacious and has superb views over the harbour. There are lots of hands on activities to do, the museum is very child friendly. There are lots of places to sit and relax and clean toilets on every floor.

The Hong Kong Museum of Art, celebrating 60 years.

The Hong Kong Museum of Art, celebrating 60 years.

View over the harbour from the museum.

View over the harbour from the museum.

Models of birds flying in front of the museum windows.

Models of birds flying in front of the museum windows.

Windows and birds.

Windows and birds.

View from the window with giant painted on waves.

View from the window with giant painted on waves.

People sitting enjoying the harbour view.

People sitting enjoying the harbour view.

From certain angles the window glass created patterns on your photos.

From certain angles the window glass created patterns on your photos.

Many of the building's doors were made to look like moon gates.

Many of the building's doors were made to look like moon gates.

Activities for children.

Activities for children.

Entry to most of the museum is free, but there are special fee-paying exhibitions, too. The current one was on Baroque Art. I did not go to this. Instead I looked at the permanent exhibitions.

I had a look at 'City Rhymes: The Melodious Notes of Calligraphy'. According to the brochure - Chinese calligraphy is the only script-based form of art that has thrived for over a millennium. It has evolved from purely a medium of communication into an embodiment of abstract aesthetic that represents the calligrapher's spirit and sentiments. Of course I can't actually read any of it, but some of it is quite beautiful.

City Rhymes Sign.

City Rhymes Sign.

Calligraphy as art.

Calligraphy as art.

Calligraphy.

Calligraphy.

Nearby there was an exhibition devoted to the art collection of the late Chinese Art connoisseur Low Chuck-tiew. His collection comprised works dating from the fifth to the twentieth centuries. He gifted much of his collection to the museum.

Statue of Low Chuck-tiew.

Statue of Low Chuck-tiew.

Chinese painting.

Chinese painting.

Chinese painting.

Chinese painting.

There were two exhibitions in particular which I really enjoyed. One was called Shopping in Canton and it was about the trading of Chinese products to foreigners in the past. It had an animation area showing the inside of different shops and examples of the products foreigners sailed here to acquire.

Apparently during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries Canton was the centre of foreign trade in China. There were busy shopping streets next to the Pearl River around the Thirteen Factories District in the south west of the city

Shopping in Canton Exhibition Sign.

Shopping in Canton Exhibition Sign.

Animated traders.

Animated traders.

Animated traders.

Animated traders.

Pictures of traders.

Pictures of traders.

Naturally one of the items overseas traders wanted was silk and there were beautiful pieces of embroidered silk on display.

Embroidered silk.

Embroidered silk.

Embroidered silk.

Embroidered silk.

Embroidered parasol.

Embroidered parasol.

Another very important item was tea and there were lovely tea caddies on display, too.

Ornate tea caddy.

Ornate tea caddy.

Tea caddies.

Tea caddies.

Picture of a tea seller.

Picture of a tea seller.

At first I was surprised to see silver ware then I remembered there are silver mines in Mui Wo, Hong Kong and in other areas of Southern China.

Silverware.

Silverware.

Of course another huge export item was porcelain and there were plenty of examples on display here.

Painting of a porcelain shop.

Painting of a porcelain shop.

Porcelain.

Porcelain.

Porcelain objects.

Porcelain objects.

I was interested to read that Chinese people started doing art works that they knew foreigners would like. These were very different from the kind of art they themselves liked. This art work could be portrait painting, pictures of sailing ships, or scenes from Chinese life.

Paintings of sailing ships for foreigners.

Paintings of sailing ships for foreigners.

Paintings for foreigners.

Paintings for foreigners.

Art for foreigners.

Art for foreigners.

Paintings for foreigners.

Paintings for foreigners.

Other things that attracted my attention were some lovely sewing boxes, some items made of ivory which, of course, is now banned here, lacquer ware furniture and a model of a flower boat. That sounds and looks like it should be very pretty, but these were actually floating brothels. Many of the women working on these had been sold to the brothel keeper. Pretty sure their life would have been hell.

Sewing kit.

Sewing kit.

Ivory boxes. Yes I do know it would look better on the elephant. Pretty sure it's old and sale of it is now banned.

Ivory boxes. Yes I do know it would look better on the elephant. Pretty sure it's old and sale of it is now banned.

Lacquer ware.

Lacquer ware.

Model of a flower boat. Looks pretty, nice name, but these were basically floating brothels.

Model of a flower boat. Looks pretty, nice name, but these were basically floating brothels.

The second exhibition I was really impressed with was called Pop Colours. This also showcased Chinese products, but this time they were grouped according to their colour. There was some information about when each colour had been fashionable and about what each colour may have symbolised.

Pop Colours Exhibition.

Pop Colours Exhibition.

Blue was apparently popular during the reign of Emperor Huizong. It is supposed to represent serenity.

The Colour Blue.

The Colour Blue.

Blue ceramics.

Blue ceramics.

Blue Vases.

Blue Vases.

Red stand for innovation. Red objects first became popular during the Qing Dynasty when advances were made with red pigmentation. As red ceramics required very high temperatures, many broke while being fired in the kiln. Lang Tingji was in charge of the royal kiln and the red pigmentation was called after him.

The Colour Red.

The Colour Red.

An arrangement of red items.

An arrangement of red items.

Red Vase.

Red Vase.

Red Ceramics.

Red Ceramics.

Black was popular during the reign of Emperor Qin and stands for fortune. I did not take many photos here as the attendant kept following me. I don't know if she was just bored, or if she thought I was going to run off with the entire collection.

The Colour Black.

The Colour Black.

Black items.

Black items.

White stands for sophistication and was popular during the reign of the Emperor Yongle.

The Colour White.

The Colour White.

White models of gods and goddesses.

White models of gods and goddesses.

White Vases.

White Vases.

Yellow was an imperial colour, only the emperor and empress could wear it. It was popular during the reign of Emperor Qianlong.

The Colour Yellow.

The Colour Yellow.

Golden gods.

Golden gods.

Yellow teapot based on a Chinese character.

Yellow teapot based on a Chinese character.

Gold Embroidered robes.

Gold Embroidered robes.

Another area was called 'Mastering Masterpieces' and tried to teach the fundamentals of Chinese painting. I liked that the walls of the exhibition were shaped like mountains and some bits projected out from the walls. Images of figures and animals moving through the landscape were then projected onto these. This was to teach how to convey depth. There was also lots of information about how to make the different coloured inks for the paintings.

Mastering Chinese painting.

Mastering Chinese painting.

Mastering Chinese painting.

Mastering Chinese painting.

I took a short rest up in the attic area of the museum. This had various areas people liked to take pictures with, such as its cloud cushions.

Up in the attic.

Up in the attic.

Up in the attic, cloud cushions.

Up in the attic, cloud cushions.

Feeling refreshed I had a look at portrait play. Here you could grab a frame and get your photo taken pretending to be a painting. There were also computer screens covered with parts of the face such as lips. When you click on the lips, you are taken to the portrait they are part of and given information about the painting. I was enjoying this until when I was investigating noses, I accidently pressed a camera button and projected an image of myself onto the screen behind me. I don't know what's meant to happen after that, but as people gathered around looking at my image on the wall, I am ashamed to say I ran away. I'm not too fond of being the centre of attention, I can tell you.

Portrait Play.

Portrait Play.

Portrait Play.

Portrait Play.

Portrait Play. I ended up on that screen with everyone watching to see what I was about to do. Nightmare.

Portrait Play. I ended up on that screen with everyone watching to see what I was about to do. Nightmare.

Even exiting the museum was fun. It was possible to just go out the way you had come in or to walk through an exhibition which, I think, was supposed to represent the journey through life. I was tired by this stage and did not take time to read about anything I was passing. I didn't entirely understand what was going on, but it was photogenic. Every now and then you would come to something that would say something like: get married/don't get married, stay in your job/change your job. I suppose it was all meant to make you consider your life choices. Personally I just liked the fact it was colourful and had strangely shaped doors, but then I don't really claim to understand art. There were paintings and sculptures interspersed throughout the rooms.

As usual I see I am wrong this exhibition is actually celebrating sixty years of the Hong Kong Museum of Art and showing its development over time.

The Long Way Out. It started off very green.

The Long Way Out. It started off very green.

The Long Way Out. Sculpture.

The Long Way Out. Sculpture.

The Long Way Out. Did I mention it was kind of green in there?

The Long Way Out. Did I mention it was kind of green in there?

The Long Way Out. Stop and make choices.

The Long Way Out. Stop and make choices.

The Long Way Out. Stop and make choices.

The Long Way Out. Stop and make choices.

The Long Way Out. Paintings.

The Long Way Out. Paintings.

The Long Way Out. Paintings.

The Long Way Out. Paintings.

The Long Way Out. Paintings and Doors.

The Long Way Out. Paintings and Doors.

The Long Way Out. Images of these sweets rolled along the screen. Little kids delighted in chasing them.

The Long Way Out. Images of these sweets rolled along the screen. Little kids delighted in chasing them.

Passing by art.

Passing by art.

The long way out. This orange area was supposed to be about going on a journey.

The long way out. This orange area was supposed to be about going on a journey.

The Long Way Out. Everything went orange near the end.

The Long Way Out. Everything went orange near the end.

When I got to the exit, the thunder and lightning were going crazy and the rain was pelting down. I looked out of the windows and was tempted to stay longer just to keep dry.

Its raining out there.

Its raining out there.

Looking towards the Peninsula Hotel as I left.

Looking towards the Peninsula Hotel as I left.

Still it wasn't too far to the MTR and a mainly dry route home.

Posted by irenevt 08:14 Archived in Hong Kong Comments (2)

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